War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0809 Chapter XXV] MORGAN'S OHIO RAID.

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COLUMBUS, July 27, 1863.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

I shall have some material facts to lay before you touching Morgan's surrender to Captain Burbick. Keep the matter open until I arrive.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 28, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

I visit General Burnside to-night to settle the question that Morgan raises as to his surrender. From what I can learn of the matter, it is all gammon on Morgan's part. Allow me to call your attention to a proclamation I send you by mail.

DAVID TOD,

Governor of Ohio.

Gov. DAVID TOD (care General Burnside):

Copy of telegrams just received:

SALINEVILLE, July 28, 1863.

I forwarded by special messenger statement of Burbick and Maus than can be relieved on. Burbick was not captain of any militia or volunteer force, on Sunday, as captain of 15 or 20 mounted Home Guards at time of surrender. Major Rue was there, and also General Shackelford. Burbick was acting as pilot for Morgan; his object to keep him from New Lisbon. Maus was a pioneer these two were they only Union men with Morgan. The surrender took place 4 miles from Gavers, and when surrounded by Union forces. Wait before acting for special messenger.

L. W. POTTER,

SALINEVILLE, July 28, 1863.

Governor TOD:

James burbick was not acting as captain of men on Sunday, but was there as any other citizen. He volunteered to pilot Morgan without any force.

JESSE DUKE, Sherif.

WM. HOSTETTER.

Shall we send the special messenger to Cincinnati to night?

G. I. YOUNG,

Aide-de-Camp, &c.

STATE OF OHIO, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Columbus, July 29, 1863.

Major General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE, Cincinnati, Ohio:

DEAR SIR: Inclosed please find statements relating to the surrender of Morgan. They present the case substantially as we supposed it to be at our interview last evening.

Very truly, yours,

DAVID TOD,

Governor of Ohio.

[Inclosure No. 1]

NEW LISBON, July 28, 1863.

Honorable DAVID TOD:

At or near Gavers, I went down and met the flag of truce, by request of Captain Curry, of the Homes Guards. They made the statement that General Morgan wanted to pass through our county without any bloodshed. Judge Curry agreed to go and converse with Morgan, escorted by his flag of truce, asking me (Burbick) to go within him. I agreed to