War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0805 Chapter XXXV. MORGAN'S OHIO RAID.

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WELLSVILLE, OHIO, July 26, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Washington, D. C.:

A citizen, who is regarded as perfectly reliable, has come into Salineville, and reports being present at the capture of Morgan and the balance of his party, at Scrogg's Meting-House, on West Fork of Beaver.

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Major-General.

WELLSVILLE, OHIO, July 26, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Washington, D. C.:

Morgan has surrendered with the balance of his men to General Shackelford.

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Major-General.

(Same to General Burnside.)

WELLSVILLE, OHIO, July 26, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Washington, D. C.:

Major Way, Ninth Michigan, reports from Salineville:

I engaged Morgan at about 87 o'clock this morning, about 1 1/2 miles from this town, and, after a severe fight, routed them killing 20 or 30, wounding about 50, taking 200 prisoners, 150 horses, and 150 stand of small-arms. Have delivered the prisoners and horses to Colonel Gallagher, Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry.

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Major-General.

THE STATE OF OHIO, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Columbus, July 26, 1863.

To the People of the State:

The exciting and important events which have transpired within the past two weeks make the present moment a fitting one for the Chief Executive to address you.

Late in the night of the 12th instant, I received reliable information that a well-organized rebel force of cavalry and artillery, supposed to exceed 5,000 in number, under the lead of the notorious John [H.] Morgan, was about to enter the southwestern portion of our State. Availing myself of the power given me by the constitution and laws, I at once, by proclamation, called out for out for the defense of the State that portion of its organized militia forces residing within the counties supposed to be in danger. As these organization were only consummated by the election of company officers on the 4th instant, but few returns had been made; hence it was quite uncertain what the actual number embraced in the call would be. The route the enemy would take was also uncertain. It was believed, however that the capital of our State was altogether the most attractive point for the enemy. This point afforded a richer field for plunder than any other within his reach, and, in addition to this, there was at Camp Chase over a thousand rebel prisoners, many of whom, including his chief of staff, had been captured from Morgan's band. Hence to this point was ordered a larger force of the militia than to any other.

The other points named, outside of Cincinnati, for the assemblage of the militia, were Camp Dennison, Chillicothe, Portsmoutn, and Marietta.