War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0800 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, July 25, 1863-8 a. m.

(Received 10 a. m.)

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

I can answer your dispatch now more fully. Morgan was 4 miles from Cadiz at 6 o'clock, moving toward the river, with our people perusing him closely and skirmishing with him. this information is from General Brooks, who is at Steubenville. I requested him to use the two bodies of cavalry which I sent from here, by railroad, to Bellaire and Cadiz Junction, and I hope he will capture him. They have both been ordered to close in on Morgan by rail.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

JULY 25, 1863.

General SHACKELFORD, Steubenville:

You can assume command of the forces under Major Way (Ninth) and Major Rue (Ninth Kentucky), and obey any orders given by General Brooks. Don't give up the chase, but push Morgan to the lakes, if necessary. Way is following him, and Rue has gone up the railroad to cut him off from the river.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

COLUMBUS, July 25, 1863-11 a. m.

General BURNSIDE:

Copy of dispatch, from a reliable source, dated 9.30 this morning:

A fight is now going on at Shepherdstown, 5 miles north of Saint Clairsville, between our forces and Morgan.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

[JULY 25, 1863.]

Governor TOD, Columbus:

A dispatch received this afternoon, after 3 o'clock, from General Brooks, at Steubenville, states that Morgan has turned northward, and has struck the Steubenville Railroad at Wintersville. Major Way was following him closely, and there was skirmishing with him at that place. I have been trying ever since to get an answer from General Brooks, but cannot. I told him to use all my cavalry at his discretion, as the enemy is now in his department. Can we not send some troops down from Cleveland? I have just sent for General Cox to come to my office. It would be well for you to notify the military commander [committee] at Carrollton and the people along the line of the Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad to do all in their power to impede Morgan's march in case he should move farther north. The cavalry, now after him, ought to annihilate him if he can be stopped until they come up.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

STEUBENVILLE, OHIO, June [July] 25, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

Morgan has just crossed the Steubenville and Indiana Railroad, going east. I have the rive well lined from here to Wheeling, but nothing