War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0798 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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BRIDGEPORT, [July] 24, [1863.]

General BROOKS:

I have about 1,000 men of my brigade bivouacked on the landing, awaiting your orders.

J. S. WHEAT,

Brigadier-General.

STEUBENVILLE, July 24, 1863.

General WHEAT, Bridgeport:

Please keep your command at Bridgeport, sending out parties to watch the roads leading into the interior of Ohio. The parties should go out 3 or 4 miles.

W. T. H. BROOKS,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, July 24, 1863.

J. T. OSBORNE, Esq.,

Louisville Journal, Louisville, Ky.:

Morgan crossed the Muskingum at Eagleport this morning. He was checked by the militia near there, and delayed long enough to allow our perusing force to get close on him. We hope to overtake him soon. He is striking for the Ohio River direct, and will probably try to cross near Sunfish. Hope to give you more definite news to-morrow.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

COLUMBUS, July 24, 1863.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

The three extra trains with your troops left Newark at 10.50 a. m., for Bellaire, via Steubenville. Have just received a report from Colonel Hill, of Runkle's command, of his engagement yesterday with Morgan, in which he held till General Shackelford's cavalry came up, when he drew his forces off. He thinks Shackelford will overtake Morgan to-day. Morgan was at Washington, camped in the public square, at 8.30 this morning.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

CINCINNATI, July 24, 1863.

Governor TOD:

I have nothing but the provost [guard] and three companies here guarding Confederate prisoners, but there are some 500 cavalry, with two pieces, which I have ordered from Kentucky, now arriving, and will be shipped as rapidly as possible. I have directed them sent by way of Columbus, so that upon their arrival at Newark they can be sent to Cambridge in case Morgan has not crossed that road, or in the direction of Seubenville in case he goes farther north. You can safely send every spare man from Columbus, too, as these men will arrive at your place, and be all the time between it and the enemy. If you have any to send, they had better be shipped at once for Zanesville and Cambridge, reporting their arrival at Zanesville for change of orders, if circumstances