War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0775 Chapter XXXV. MORGAN'S OHIO RAID.

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p. m. yesterday, Saturday, six hours after the rear of Morgan had left same place. Morgan's force was at Chester, 15 miles east of Rutland, at 12 o'clock last night. From our own scouts in front of Morgan, we have reliable information that all roads between Chester and Buffington Island have been blocked by felling trees, destruction of bridges over deep ravines, &c. They will impede Morgan's progress very much. Wagons and artillery could not have crossed last night. There is no escape for him if he fails at Buffington, as he will be compelled to turn and come back for some distance on the same road he went in. One of the scouts reports positively two gunboats at Buffington. I cannot say whether it is so or not, but it seems to be generally believed here.

A. V. BARRINGER,

Captain, and Commissary of Subsistence.

JULY 19, 1863.

[Lieutenant] J. W. CONINE,

Colonel RUNKLE,

Scott's Landing, Little Hocking:

Extend your scouts well to the right, toward the railroad, so as to give you ample time to meet Morgan, in case any portion of his force attempts to go into the interior again. His entire force ought to be captured or broken to pieces.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, July 19, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel DRAKE, Lexington, Ky.:

Morgan's force broken up to-day; about 1,000 prisoners already captured; a great many killed and wounded. Troops pursuing and picking them up. Colonels [W. W.] Ward and Dick [R. C.] Morgan among the prisoners. I will telegraph Colonel Harney direct. Expect to start back in noon train.

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, July 19, 1863.

Colonel HARNEY, Glasgow, Ky.:

Eightieth Indiana has been ordered to Glasgow. Keep yourself constantly posted concerning enemy's force and movements, and send new to me at Lexington.

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General.

BUFFINGTON, July 19 [?], 1863-1.30 a. m.

General BURNSIDE:

I reached this point about 5 o'clock this a. m., in a dense fog. I immediately move, with about 75 cavalry; made a reconnaissance in person. I soon encountered the enemy in force, who opened a severe fire upon my escort, mortally wounding Major McCook, paymaster and Lieutenant Price; killing 1; captured Captain Rue, my aide-de-camp, Henshaw,