War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0768 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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with General Hobson and our other commanders, and urge them forward. Report where the enemy is from time to time. Have you heard from General Judah?

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

JULY 17, 1863.

Captain JOHN SEBASTIAN,

Steamer Magnolia, Maysville:

Think you had better be at or near Maysville until to-morrow morning. Think the enemy will attempt to cross in that neighborhood. Report early in the morning, by telegraph.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 17, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Morgan, when last heard from, was in the southeast corner of Jackson County. I have a strong militia force, under command of Runkle, close upon him, and expect to catch him. So far as I am advised, there will be no disturbance in Ohio growing out of the draft.

DAVID TOD.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, July 17, 1863.

Governor TOD, Columbus:

The beard is ordered to be sent as you wish. The Pike County militia did not attempt to obstruct Morgan, and gave him free course. Hobson is still close after him. Judah's force is pressing up from below. Runkle is above, at Gallipolis. They have some heavy guns in position, and a considerable militia force there. If the militia will obstruct the roads, as ordered, he will be caught; but if they leave the ways all open, his stealing of fresh horses constantly enables him to outstrip our men.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS. TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 12.

Lexington, Ky., July 17, 1863.

The general commanding the corps hereby extends his thanks to the 200 officers and soldiers of the Twenty-fifth Michigan Regiment, under Colonel O. H. Moore, who so successfully resisted, by their gallantry and heroic bravery, the attack of a vastly superior force of the enemy, under the rebel general John [H.] Morgan, at Tebb's Bend, on Green River, on the 4th of July, 1863, which they killed one-fourth as many of the enemy as their own little bank amounted to, and wounded a number equal to their own.

The general also desires to commend, in the warmest terms, the officers and soldiers of the Twentieth Kentucky Regiment, under Lieutenant Colonel C. S. Hanson, who, at Lebanon, Ky., for six hours sustained a