War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0761 Chapter XXXVI. MORGAN'S OHIO RAID.

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JULY 16, 1863.

Generals RUNKLE, MANSON, and JUDAH:

Hobson dispatches from Jacktown-probably meaning Jacksonville-at 3.30 p. m. yesterday, that he has a brigade 3 miles in advance of that place; that Morgan is 15 miles in advance of him; that he (Hobson) is traveling 40 miles a day, men in good spirits, and will continue pursuit as long as possible. Dispatch from jackson reports Morgan at 7 p. m. encamped 13 miles west of that place. At 1.40 a. m. operator at Hamden says courier, just in from Jackson, reports Morgan entering that place as he left. Colonel Runkle was at Hamden at 1.30 to-night, and will endeavor to reach jackson with force of 2,000 or 3,000 militia. Judah reached Portsmouth at 5.30 p. m. yesterday, and has gone in direction of Oak Hill.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, July 16, 1863.

Commodore PENNOCK,

Commanding Squadron at Cairo, Ill.:

There are three gunboats at Louisville which I would like to have here, if they are not needed below, to assist in patrolling the river, to prevent Morgan from crossing. Can I have them sent up at once?

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

JULY 16, 1863.

Captain FITCH,

Commanding Fleet, Pomeroy:

I trust to you to check the enemy at Pomeroy and Buffington Island until our men get up. There is a force of our men and two pieces of artillery at Buffington. Captain Sebastian's boat is, of course, subject to your order. I am sure you will not allow them to cross if you can prevent it. Captain Sebastian should be started at once.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

UNITED STATES STEAMER MOOSE,

Off Manchester, July 16, 1863.

AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE,

Commanding the Department of the Ohio:

SIR: As well as I can judge, Morgan is still moving on to the eastward. It is reported that a portion of his command camped last night at or a little beyond West Union. Some of his men were in Georgetown yesterday, and drove in the Ripley pickets, but would not attempt the town. I was in hopes that General Manson would, on his arrival at Maysville, move out on the road to Decatur, and intercept or force him on to the river at Ripley. I could have held him there for a week. The prospects now look rather dubious. He is said to be making for the mountains, and, I fear, will make through and strike some point on the river beyond our reach, as the water is now falling very rapidly. Are there no forces at Chillicothe that can force him on to river before he gets too high up? If there is telegraphic communication at Portsmouth, please let me know what prospect there is of his forward movement by land being checked. If I can get him on the river in my reach, I can