War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0726 KY.,MID.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXV.

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INDIANAPOLIS, July 11, 1863.

General BURNSIDE:

In my dispatches of yesterday I expressed the opinion that the rebel force moving toward Orleans was only a detachment. The capture of Orleans is not confirmed, but I have ordered Hughes to fight if they come there. I have ordered 800 men from Seymour to Madison, by way of Columbus. The Verona route would have been better, but a change of cars would have been necessary at that point of cars waiting at Seymour. The same train can take the troops to Madison. Will there be gunboats at Madison and Westport? I hope we may be able to prevent Morgan's escape. I have no doubt but his coming was well known to thousands in this State, but they have not dared to show their hands. Scouts at Lexington report that the rebels burned Vienna last night, but do not report them on the road to Lexington, nor do they say what direction they have taken. I have telegraphed Love to try and send a messenger to Hobson, for fear he will not succeed.

O. B. WILLCOX,

Brigadier-General.

CINCINNATI, July 11, 1863.

General WILLCOX, Indianapolis:

In some of the messages sent by General Hughes and taken off the wires here, he states that he is short of ammunition. Have you not plenty at Indianapolis to send him? It can be sent from here. I learned from General Boyle that the gunboats sent from Louisville up the river are engaged near Madison, which indicates that the enemy are trying to cross there.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

MITCHELL, July 11, 1863.

Governor MORTON and O. B. WILLCOX, Indianapolis:

Rebels in camp at Salem. General Hobson, with 4,000 cavalry and six cannon, at Corydon. I have now 2,000 raw men, but non ammunition for half. Let General Love send me some re-enforcements from Seymour, and let him move down with his command, leaving the railroad at Brownstown, and I from this point in front of the rebels, moving slowly to co-operate with Hobson's attack. Answer at once. Keep General Love and myself so advised as to act in concert.

JAMES HUGHES,

Brigadier-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, July 11, 1863-5 p.m. [Received 5.40 p.m.]

General BURNSIDE:

I am in doubt whether Vernon is actually in the possession of the rebels or not. I am inclined to think not, from the following dispatch. A prominent citizen of Vernon telegraphs me they are within a mile of Vernon, and asks for forces. A part of my forces are there. It is the