War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0717 Chapter XXXV. MORGAN'S OHIO RAID.

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JULY 9, 1863.

General BOYLE, Louisville, Ky.:

Governor Morton and General Willcox are both very much afraid that Morgan intends moving on Indianapolis at once, and unless you hear from him by morning at or near New Albany, I shall begin to believe such is his object. They are very anxious to have the Seventy-first Indiana and Myers' battery sent back at once. If you think you can spare them to-morrow morning, after troops arrive from Munfordville, you can send them up. I sent you a battery from here by steamer. Has it arrived yet? Hobson should be ordered to follow close on to Morgan. Can't you dispatch a boat or a messenger to him at once, with orders not to lose a moment's time. I am afraid he is too late as it is. He will be fully twenty-four hours behind Morgan, and I do not think his pursuit has been rapid. He ought to have been onto Morgan before his whole force crossed at Brandenburg. Is there a telegraph to Litchfield, so that you can get a message to Judah? Please answer at once.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

JULY 9, 1863.

Governor MORTON, Indianapolis, Ind.:

Corydon is 120 miles from Indianapolis, and if Morgan is disposed to go to Indianapolis it will take him two days from Corydon to do it, even if he meets with no resistance from Home Guards. I am pretty well satisfied he does not intend to go there, but intends to attack New Albany and Jeffersonville. A force of cavalry large enough to beat him was at Brandenburg to-day, and transports have been sent down to cross them, and they will be close upon him. Should he attack the depots at New Albany and Jeffersonville, all the forces there will be needed. Should he not, I will send from here and Louisville early to-morrow a force sufficient to make Indianapolis secure. Instead of concentrating troops at Mitchell and Seymour both, it would be well to have a considerable force at Seymour, with a small one at Mitchell, with transportation, all ready to fall back quickly upon Indianapolis if the enemy advance in that direction. Scouts can be kept well out, so that there will be no danger of the trains being captured. You may rely upon it I will do all in my power to prevent disaster, but by scattering the troops in too many places I am rendered too weak to defend any one of them.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

UNITED STATES STEAMER SPRINGFIELD, Off New Albany, July 9, 1863.

Lieutenant Commander LEROY FITCH,

No. 5, East Front:

I engaged John [H.] Morgan this morning at 9 o'clock at Brandenburg. I have been fighting nearly all day. He is crossing over to Indiana. He has 10,000 men and several pieces of heavy artillery. He has his batteries planted at three places, commanding the river. We will have to have boats below town to operate with me. He wants to hold that place until he recrosses.

JAMES WATSON,

Acting Ensign, Commanding.