War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0701 Chapter XXXV. MORGAN'S OHIO RAID.

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DANVILLE, July 6, 1863-8.30 p.m.

General HARTSUFF:

About 100 rebels went into Harrodsburg this morning, and left at 10 a.m., on Bloomfield road, toward Bardstown. Some 14 went to Salvisa and in that direction, to see their friends, and then went on the Bloomfield road. No force has gone toward the Kentucky River. From all I can learn, they are moving toward Bardstown west from here. They are probably some 8 miles ahead of me. The horses of the Eighth and Ninth are badly used up. Was the order for Colonel David to return sent before I left?

W. P. SANDERS,

Colonel, Commanding.

LEBANON, July 6, 1863.

General BOYLE:

General Hobson's forces have gone in pursuit of Morgan. Our forces have just left here. It is rumored that Morgan was attacked near Bardstown this morning. We captured 40 of his men.

B. J. SPAULDING.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 6, 1863. [Received 12 m.]

Major-General BURNSIDE:

With deep mortification I have to announce to you that but 1,000 have as yet responded to the call for six months' men. This throws us for immediate force, should it become necessary, upon the recently organized militia or upon troops to be raised by declaration of martial law. The progress of the draft is so slow that I am discouraged about getting any aid from that source. Please give me your opinion as to the necessity of an immediate force, and the means of raising it. Should a resort to martial law be deemed advisable, of course the order must come from you. I would, however, be glad to have a consultation with you before it is issued.

DAVID TOD,

Governor.

CAMP NELSON, July 7, 1863.

General BURNSIDE:

Received an almost unintelligible dispatch from Judah, dated ferry on Green River, 12 o'clock yesterday, and sent by courier to Glasgow. He says he feels dreadfully at his luck. The river rose 3 feet while he was crossing; he would be unable to get across before night, but would try to make up for lost time. Operator at Glasgow says dispatch was so badly written he could not make it out. Have heard no news from the front to-day. Have sent for Carter, who will be here to-night. Feel a little better than I did this morning. Please send any news of to-day from any direction. Will inspect here to-morrow, if able, and send you result.

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Major-General.