War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0637 Chapter XXXV. MORGAN'S OHIO RAID.

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Return of Casualties in the Union forces engaged in the Morgan raid in Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio, July 2-26, 1863.

[Compiled from nominal list of casualties, returns, &c.]

Captured

Killed. Wounded. or missing.

Comman Office Enlist Office Enlist Office Enlist Aggre

d. rs. ed rs. ed rs. ed gate.

men. men. men.

Staff ...... ...... 2 ...... ...... ...... 2

14th ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... ...... 1

Illino

is

Cavalr

y.

5th ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... 1 2

Indian

a

Cavalr

y

63rd ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... 2 3

Indian

a

Infant

ry

1st 1 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 1

Kentuc

ky

Cavalr

y

20th ...... 5 ...... 16 ...... ...... 21

Kentuc

ky

Infant

ry

8th ...... ...... ...... 2 ...... 1 3

Michig

an

Cavalr

y

9th ...... ...... ...... 1 ...... ...... 1

Michig

an

Cavalr

y

25th ...... 6 1 22 ...... ...... 29

Michig

an

Infant

ry

2nd ...... 1 ...... 2 ...... ...... 3

Ohio

Cavalr

y

23rd ...... ...... ...... 1 ...... ...... 1

Ohio

Infant

ry

45th ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... ...... 1

Ohio

Infant

ry

4th U. ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... ...... 1

S.

Cavalr

y

Garris ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... 4 5

on,

Camp

Dennis

on,

Ohio

Total 1 18 3 44 ...... 8 74

OFFICERS KILLED.- Captain Jesse M. Carter, First Kentucky Cavalry.

OFFICERS MORTALLY WOUNDED.-Major Daniel McCook, paymaster.

Numbers 2. Reports of Brigadier General James M. Shackelford, U. S. Army, commanding First Brigade, Second Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, &c.

HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES FORCES,

Geiger's Creek, July 20, 1863-9 p. m.

COLONEL: We chased John [H.] Morgan and his command over 50 miles to-day, after heavy skirmishing for 6 or 7 miles between the Forty-fifth Ohio, of Colonel Wolford's brigade, which was in the advance of the enemy.

We succeeded in bringing the enemy to a stand about 3 o'clock this p. m., when a fight ensued, which lasted an hour, when the rebels fled, taking refuge upon a very high bluff. I sent a flag of truce demanding the immediate and unconditional surrender of Morgan and his command. The flag was received by Colonel [Cicero] Coleman and other officers, who came down and asked a personal interview. They asked an hour for consultation amongst their officers. I granted forty minutes, in which time the command, excepting Morgan, who deserted his command, taking with him a very small squad, surrendered. It was my understanding that Morgan himself had surrendered; learned it was the understanding of Morgan's officers and men. The number of killed and wounded is inconsiderable. The number of prisoners is between 1,000 and 1,500, including a large number of colonels, majors, and line officers.

I captured between 600 or 700 prisoners yesterday. I think I will capture Morgan himself to-morrow. I had Colonels Wolford's and