War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0625 Chapter XXXV. THE MIDDLE TENNESSEE CAMPAIGN.

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At 4 p. m. the general received the following:

JULY 2, 1863.

Lieutenant-General POLK:

General Bragg directs you to put your train in march over the mountain at once sending with the train the brigade of your corps now at Cowan.

W. W. MACKALL,

Chief of Staff.

And at once put the train in motion over the mountain, two brigades being detailed for that purpose, the enemy pressing our cavalry at Allisona, having crossed at fords both above and below that point.

Friday, July 3, at 2 a. m., the general reached University Place, the trains and troops having all passed, and the cavalry left to defend the passed and dispute the approach of the enemy. At 4 p. m. he left with his staff, and encamped with General Cheatham 6 miles from University Place.

Saturday, July 4, by daylight the whole command was in motion. At 10 a. m. the general received the following dispatch:

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

Railroad Crossing, near University.

Lieutenant-General POLK:

The enemy are engaging me very warmly at this point; our men are maintaining their ground bravely. The enemy have infantry and cavalry, and are evidently re-enforcing.

Very respectfully,

JOS. WHEELER,

Major-General.

And at 11.30 a. m. the following:

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY,

Near Railroad Crossing, July 4, 1863-9.20 a. m.[?]

Lieutenant-General POLK:

I would respectfully suggest that infantry be left to block up some of the roads, as the cavalry can retire by one road and can block up the road behind them as they go down, if axes can be left by the infantry to accomplish the work. These precautions may prove unnecessary, but, if the enemy press us very warmly, may be of some advantage.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

JOS. WHEELER,

Major-General.

And having made provision for acting on the suggestions contained in Wheeler's dispatch, sent him the following:

HEADQUARTERS POLK'S CORPS, ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

July 4, 1863-7 a. m.[?]

GENERAL: The lieutenant-general commanding acknowledges receipt this moment of your none of yesterday 7 p. m. respecting supply of axes. He has stripped his batteries in order to comply with your request, and sends back by a detail all the available axes of his command, which he regrets to say may not be more than a dozen; but whese, if regularly handled, amy accomplish the desired work. The descent is exceedingly difficult. General wharton has already been instructed to send forward to the top of the mountain a detail, with all his available axes, to commence at once the work of obstruction by cutting the trees half in tow, to be completed after you shall have passed. The axes now collected are sent to General Martin, who will detail an adequate force to co-operate with General Wharton in this work.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

THOMAS M. JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Major General JOSEPH WHEELER.]

Sent to General Martin to be read and acted on by him and by General Wharton.

THOMAS M. JACK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

40 R R-VOL XXIII, PT I