War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0620 Chapter XXXV. KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA.

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whenever a wagon breaks down. I ordered to shove all wagons which were broken down out of the road, and push on. He said his orders from higher authority were to leave none of the wagons behind, and he would obey those orders. This policy will risk the safety of the army. I am hear the enemy's artillery and small-arms on my flank and rear.

P. R. CLEBURNE,

Major-General.

[Indorsements.]

HEADQUARTERS HARDEE'S CORPS, ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

June 27, 1863.

Respectfully referred to Brigadier-General Mackall, chief of staff.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

Lieutenant-General HARDEE, Commanding Corps:

Fully approved.

B. B. [BRAXTON BRAGG.]

The general at once replied as follows:

IN THE FIELD, FIVE MILES FROM TULLAHOMA,

June 28-1.45 a. m.

Brigadier-General MACKALL, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I am in receipt of your note of 10 p. m. of the 27th, with its inclosure. The conduct of Colonel Donald [Donnell] is in the highest degree reprehensible, and entirely at variance with orders from these headquarters and the particle of this corps. From whom he has received orders I know not. The impropriety shall be stopped, and the facts investigated.

L. POLK,

Lieutenant-General.

At 2.30 the general received the following:

TULLAHOMA, June 27-11 p. m.

Lieutenant-General POLK, Schoefner's Bridge Road:

Push on your trains at once with the greatest dispatch. Martin's cavalry has been utterly defeated before Shelbyville.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL,

Chief of Staff.

And immediately issued orders for the whole train to be put in motion. He addressed to following note to General Wharton:

IN THE FIELD, FIVE MILES FROM TULLAHOMA,

June 28, 1863-3 a. m.

[General J. A. WHARTON:]

GENERAL: I have just been informed that General Martin has been badly defeated at Shelbyville, from which I take it for granted that the rear of the column on the Rowesville and Tulahoma road in uncovered by Cavalry. If you have no other orders to the contrary, I think it desirable, and so directs, that you move your column back, or so much of if as is not under other orders, to Rowesville, so as to cover the rear of my troops and those of General Hardee moving on this road. If the infantry shall have moved onward from Rowesville before you reach there, you had better follow them up the creek about a mile to a point at which a road comes into the Rowesville and Tullahoma road from Shelbyville. Supposing you free to act, this movement should be made as promptly as possible, so as to intercept any movement from Shelbyville via Schoefner's Bridge. Inform the officer in the rear of the column of what you conclude to do, and me also.

L. POLK,

Lieutenant-General.

At daylight the train and troops were all in motion, but owing to the continued rains the roads were in a terrible condition, and after infinite labor by heavy details the trains arrived at Tullahoma at only about 4 p. m.