War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0534 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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my headquarters at Houston's Spring, on Webb's plantation, to-night. I have not yet decided whether to send Stanley to Fairfield direct by the way of Bellbuckle or around by Millersburg, but shall decide in a few hours. I did not receive your order to move until 6 o'clock this morning. We have a few prisoners. There were about 400 Confederates at this place this morning.

Will dispatch you again soon, the moment I hear from Shelbyville. Very respectfully,

G. GRANGER,

Major-General.

Brigadier General JAMES A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff.

SHELBYVILLE, TENN., June 27, 1863-8 p.m.

GENERAL: We occupied this place at 6 o'clock; captured three pieces of artillery and 300 prisoners, among them 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, and a score of other officers. The Stars and Stripes floated from many windows and house-tops, and we met a hearty welcome. Bragg left here this morning at 6 o'clock, for Tullahoma. Cars were running all night, removing the stores, sick, and wounded. We saved the bridge over Duck River; intercepted the enemy at that place. Mr. Caldwell, a Union man, reports Bragg had 27,000 at this place and Wartrace, about 18,000 of them being at this place. Very few stores are to be found. I move at 9 o'clock, in pursuit of their wagon train, on the south side of Duck River. It cannot possibly be more than 9 miles distant, and the roads are very heavy. I hope to be able to destroy it.

G. GRANGER,

Major-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General JAMES A. GARFIELD,

Chief of Staff.

SHELBYVILLE, TENN., June 28, 1863-8 a.m.

GENERAL: I was much disappointed last night in not being able to continue our pursuit of the enemy. After a long and hard march and constant fighting yesterday afternoon, our men and horses were too exhausted to move. Forrest pressed around our rear last night, moving eastward. Had I known he was so doing, I could have thrown my force between the retreating rebel army and his forces, but even then our men and horses were too badly used up to insure any prospect of success.

We have captured between 400 and 500 prisoners, and are yet bringing them in, and [J. H.] Wiggins' battery and all of its officers and men. Wheeler escaped only by scarifying the Eighth Confederate Cavalry, which, together with its colonel and other officers, fell into our hands. Our troops behaved in the most gallant manner.

I sent you a dispatch last night, and have received no reply. I am at a loss to know what orders to give to the cavalry, whether to remain in this place or join you. They have no supplies nearer than Christiana. Shall I bring up their transportation and supplies to this place, or shall I send them across by way of Guy's Gap, Bellbuckle, and Fairfield to Tullahoma? The country north of Duck River is, I think, entirely clear and safe.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. GRANGER,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS.