War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0425 Chapter XXXV. THE MIDDLE TENNESSEE CAMPAIGN.

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Numbers 6. Report of Major William M. Miles, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry, Provost-Marshal-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND.

Nashville, July 25, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the following in regard to prisoners, the result of the advance of the Army of the Cumberland, June 24, 1863, engagements, occupation of Shelbyville, Wartrace, Tullahoma,and pursuit of the enemy:

Enlisted men captured................................... 1,575

Colonels................................................ 1

Lieutenants-colonels.................................... 2

Majors.................................................. 4

Captains................................................ 12

Lieutenants............................................. 40

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Total................................................... 1,634

Of the number, 616 claimed to have delivered themselves to our forces voluntarily, being conscripts or tried of the war.

Of the number who claimed to be deserters, 195 were paroled as prisoners of war, and forwarded to Louisville, Ky., with instructions accompanying to release, upon taking the oath of allegiance, and, in addition to their parole, to remain north of the Ohio during the war; 96 were enlisted into our army, and 325 were released and permitted to return to their homes, within our lines, upon being paroled as prisoners of war, and to report when called for.

The remainder of the sum total (1,018) were forwarded for exchange.

I am, general, very respectfully,

WM. M. WILES.

Major and Provost-Marshal-General.

Brigadier General JAMES A. GARFIELD.

Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland.

Numbers 7. Reports of Major General George H. Thomas, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps.

ON THE ROAD TO FAIRFIELD,

June 27, 1863-10 a.m. (Received 11.25 a.m.)

GENERAL: Generals Rousseau and Brannan have their advance at Fairfield. General Negley, with the train, is very nearly across to the road from Fairfield to Manchester. When shall the troops move to Manchester? Now, or will I await further orders? The enemy have made but feeble resistance this morning. I think General Sheridan had better move up to cover the passage of McCook's train, enabling my train to join my troops to-night. General Rousseau has just sent me word that the enemy passed the point where his advance now is two hours ago. The citizens report that they are going to Tullahoma. General Rousseau reports no enemy in sight.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

Major General W. S. ROSECRANS,