War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0385 Chapter XXXV. SANDERS' RAID IN EAST TENNESSEE.

Search Civil War Official Records

to go through another, which was impassable for artillery. He therefore destroyed the two pieces of artillery which he took with him, and three captured pieces, and left them behind.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, June 27, 1863.

Colonel Sanders' command has arrived inside of our lines. He left on the expedition but 1 killed, 2 wounded, and a few stragglers taken prisoners. He captured ten pieces of artillery instead of three, as I before reported, which he destroyed. The report of the destruction of the bridges and public stores, and capture of prisoners and small-arms, was correctly given in his first dispatch. He and his command deserve great credit for their patience, endurance, and gallantry. The Strawberry Plains Bridge is the most important on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. Intelligent men from that neighborhood assert that it will take months to rebuild it. A written report will be sent in a day or two.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

Numbers 2. Reports of Colonel William P. Sanders, Fifth Kentucky Cavalry, commanding expedition.

BOSTON, June 23, 1863.

I arrived here with my command at 11 o'clock this morning. I struck the railroad at Lenoir's; destroyed the road up to Knoxville; made demonstrations against Knoxville so as to have their troops drawn from above; destroyed the track, and started for Strawberry Plains; burned Slate Creek Bridge (312 feet long), the Strawberry Plains Bridge (1,600 feet long), and also Mossy Creek Bridge (325 feet long). I captured 3 pieces of artillery, some 200 boxes of artillery ammunition, over 500 prisoners, 1,000 stand of arms, and destroyed a large amount of salt, sugar, flour, and saltpeter, and one saltpeter works and other stores. My command is much fatigues; we have had but two nights' sleep since leaving Williamsburg. The force in East Tennessee was larger than I had supposed. I did not attack Loudon Bridge for reasons that I will explain. At Mossy Creek I determined to return in the mountains. I has very great difficulty that was unexpected. I found the gap strongly guarded with artillery and infantry, and blockaded with fallen timber, through which I expected to return. A force was also forming in our rear. I determined to cross at Smith's Gap. I will report more fully as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. P. SANDERS,

Colonel, Commanding.

General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE.

25 R R-VOL XXIII, PT I