War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0380 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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sent out scouts on both of my flanks, also strong advance guards, with flankers. I found no trace of the enemy until I got within 1 1/2 miles of Versailles. I drove their pickets into and through Versailles, and found that their force consisted of 200 of [A. A.] Russell's cavalry. I also sent a scout 3 miles out on the Eagleville road, but without finding any of the enemy. I examined the road closely, and I do not think anything has been over it since the First Cavalry Brigade was there.

The citizens informed me that no scout of any kind had been there since that time. I scoured the country thoroughly, and returned to my camp, arriving here at 6 a. m.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK W. MIX,

Major, Commanding Fourth Michigan.

Captain W. B. CURTIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Cavalry Division.

JUNE 13, 1863.-Scout on the Manchester Pike, Tenn.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1.-Brigadier General John B. Turchin, U. S. Army.

Numbers 2.-Lieutenant Colonel William B. Sipes, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Numbers 1. Report of Brigadier General John B. Turchin, U. S. Army.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., June 13, 1863.

SIR: I respectfully report that at 7 a. m. this day, Lieutenant-Colonel Sipes, with 260 men of the Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, 105 men of the Third Indiana Cavalry, and one section of Stokes' battery, moved out on the Manchester pike. When 10 miles out, he met the enemy's pickets and drove them in, pursuing them 2 miles. The country being unfavorable for cavalry movements, he then withdrew and returned to camp. The pickets were reported by a citizen to belong to the Texas Rangers, of Hardee's corps. At the same hour, Colonel Nicholas moved with his regiment (the Second Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry) on the Wartrace road. At 12 miles out he met two squads of rebel cavalry, each about 30 strong, and dispersed them, after firing a few shots. He moved about half a mile farther forward, and then returned to camp. He could not learn that any force of the rebels had encamped or appeared in any way on the Wartrace road for a week past. Two brigades of infantry are reported to be at Libery Gap.

In accordance with instructions received from you this p. m., no patrols will be sent to-morrow.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. TURCHIN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Second Cavalry Division.

Major W. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.