War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0362 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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I captured 18 prisoners, killed and wounded 15, and killed a large number of horses, and burned one ammunition wagon. Among the prisoners taken were 4 of General Armstrong's escort, with the colors of his escort.

Our casualties are as follows: Colonel J. K. Faulkner, Seventh Kentucky Cavalry, severely wounded in the thigh; Colonel Wickliffe Cooper, Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, was thrown from his horse while riding beside the 2 men killed and 2 men wounded of the Second Michigan Cavalry, and 1 man killed of the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry. Our loss in horses is not positively known. Think our number good.

The officers and men of my command fought bravely. On the morning of the 5th the enemy had all crossed the Harpeth River, and had fallen back south of Franklin.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. P. CAMPBELL,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain W. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

JUNE 4, 1863.-Operations on the Shelbyville Pike, near Murfreesborough Tenn.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1.-Major General Alexander McD. McCook, U. S. Army.

Numbers 2.-Colonel William B. Sipes, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry.

Numbers 1. Report of Major General Alexander McD. McCook, U. S. Army.

JUNE 4, 1863.

GENERAL: The enemy have attacked General Carlin's pickets in front of Marshall Knob with artillery and cavalry. I have ordered him to hold on, and have advanced another brigade to the Shelbyville pike bridge.

A. McD. McCOOK,

Major-General.

Numbers 2. Report of Lieutenant Colonel William B. Sipes, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry.

HDQRS. SEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY,

June 5, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to orders, I yesterday marched with the Seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, numbering 227 men, exclusive of officers, and one piece of artillery, under command of Lieutenant Newell. I proceeded out the Shelbyville turnpike about 3 miles, and was there stopped by Brigadier General Jeff. C. Davis, commanding a division. The Thirty-ninth Indiana Mounted Infantry, with which I had been ordered to co-operate, was there with