War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0296 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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Numbers 15. - Colonel D. W. Chenault, Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry (Confederate).

Numbers 16. - Brigadier General John Pegram, C. S. Army.

Numbers 17. - Colonel J. J. Morrison, First Georgia Cavalry, commanding brigade.

Numbers 18. - Colonel George W. McKenzie, Fifth Tennessee Cavalry.

Numbers 19. - Captain A. L. Mims, Fifth Tennessee Cavalry.

Numbers 1. Reports of Major General Ambrose E. Burnside, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Ohio.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, May 2, 1863.

After three brushes, our people occupied Monticello with infantry. The cavalry is in pursuit in direction of Albany. The troops behaved well. Morgan is said to be at or near Gainesborough. We hold Tompkinsville, with guards at the Celina Ford and below. We will have difficulty in holding all we have taken, as there is no forage there. An expedition will cross at Williamsburg to-morrow or next day. Humphrey Marshall is at Mount Pleasant.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, May 11, 1863.

The following has just been received from General Boyle:

Jacob fought rebels yesterday eight hours. Last part of engagement lasted fortyfive minutes. It was desperate. He drove rebels at point of the bayonet for half a mile, when Morgan threw his whole force upon him, consisting of nine regiments, 6,000 strong. Jacob fell back in good order, contesting every inch; brought off his whole command in defiance of Morgan. Jacob had only 500 men in battle; loss not ascertained; rebel loss heavy. Morgan occupies the Narrows. If General Carter would make a rapid movement by way of Monticello, Morgan could be cut off. Prisoners state that this has deranged the whole of Morgan's plans.

BOYLE.

This shows where Morgan is. Certainly a portion of his force is on the south side of the Cumberland, at the mouth of Greasy Creek, as the fight took place there; but I think the above is exaggeration.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

General W. S. ROSECRANS.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, May 11, 1863.

The following has just been received from General Boyle. Please have it repeated to Carter:

General Manson says Jacob had a hard fight of eight hours with Morgan. Loss heavy in the Twentieth Michigan; 3 officers killed. Morgan sent a flag of truce, demanding surrender; Jacob replied, "Never." Enemy's loss very heavy. Jacob expects enemy to attack him this morning. Jacob has succeeded in crossing all his men to north side of the Cumberland. I have ordered Jacob to fall back to Columbia, and ordered Colonel Morrison to Columbia to re-enforce him. Morgan intends to make a raid.

BOYLE.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

General O. B. WILLCOX, Lexington, Ky.