War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0267 Chapter XXXV. EXPEDITION TO M'MINNVILLE, TENN.

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Numbers 4. - Colonel Eli Long, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, commanding Second Cavalry Brigade.

Numbers 5. - Captain Elmer Otis, Fourth U. S. Cavalry.

Numbers 6. - Brigadier General William T. Martin, C. S. Army.

Numbers 1. Report of Major General Joseph J. Reynolds, U. S. Army, commanding expedition.

HDQRS. FIFTH DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn., April 30, 1863.

COLONEL: The troops employed in the recent expedition to McMinnville, & c., returned to-day, and a report will be most readily comprehended by reference to the operations of each day.

The expedition consisted of the following force:

Colonel Wilder's brigade (three regiments mounted infantry), about ............................................................ 1,100

Colonel Hall's brigade, about .............................. 1,400

Brigadier-General Wagner's brigade, about .................. 1,300

Colonel Starkweather's brigade, about ...................... 1,300

Cavalry, under Colonel Minty, about ........................ 1,500

In all, about .............................................. 6,600

April 20, the whole command made Readyville. At dark a mounted scout was sent to Woodbury, which returned before midnight. This scout was reported at McMinnville, and deceived the enemy as to the movement of the next day.

April 21, the advance, a cavalry force of about 350, under Colonel Eli Long, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, destined to strike the railroad from Manchester to McMinnville, took the road at 2 a. m., and, turning to the southeast just after leaving Woodbury, directed their march upon Morrison, under the guidance of Captain Fleming, late of Stokes' (Tennessee) cavalry. The remainder of the mounted force (cavalry) under Colonel Minty, and mounted infantry, the whole under Colonel Wilder, promptly followed, and beyond Woodbury took the old McMinnville road, which passes between Jacksborough and the McMinnville pike. The advance of this force captured a portion of a picket belonging to a regiment of the enemy stationed on the pike. Those that escaped reported that the main mounted column was a flanking party. The force that moved for the railroad, under Colonel Long, appears not to have been discovered at all until they were near the road and in a condition to accomplish their work beyond doubt. The supporting infantry force closely followed the mounted column, and, after the mounted force left the direct pike to McMinnville, the infantry support was apparently the only force moving toward that place.

Soon after leaving Woodbury we discovered the mounted regiment of the enemy, which was known to be on the road, and which gradually retired before us, evidently not aware of the fact that our mounted column had passed them and was nearing McMinnville. We abstained from firing on this regiment, and moved cautiously, but firmly, upon it, until we reached Glascock's, 9 miles from McMinnville, the point at which we were to await advices from Wilder. This point was made by 12.30 p. m., having marched 10 miles.

About 4 p. m. I received a communication from Wilder, who had taken possession of McMinnville at 1.30 p. m. with his advance of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry and mounted infantry scouts at a charge, sup