War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0243 Chapter XXXV. EXPEDITION TO COURTLAND, ALA., ETC.

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brigade at Big Black. Two steamboats also lie at Big Black Bridge, at Jackson, one right above Jackson. For 15 miles toward Grenada two Indian regiments, at Grenada lot of militia. Line of Yazoo is heavily guarded, and very thoroughly intrenched. They are living from hand to month, all their provisions being locked up in Red River. Along line of railroad great efforts are being made to collect grain and bacon. They run one or two cars per day from each station. It was said that 8,000 men were going from Vicksburg to Johnston; 3,000 went from Meridian; five trains of empty cars toward Vicksburg the day the scouts left there. They have great fears of a movement by land. Should any troops leave Vicksburg, I shall know it at Columbus. Four or five regiments, a command from Florida, under Colonel Finney, came to Okolona three days ago, about 400 [4,000?] strong; also a regiment to Colton. All the militia of the State are being concentrated along our front; the rest of the forces are about as I wrote. I send the Vicksburg man to Grant, he having been sent on his order. The guns at Vicksburg are mostly on Yazzo and Mississippi Rivers. Front very firm. In rear they do not fear an attack from that direction, but do fear the cutting off their supplies by way of Grenada or Corinth. There is no doubt but that all their supplies come now from Mississippi, and they are getting scarce.

R. J. OGLESBY,

Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

JACKSON, April 14, 1863.

General HURLBUT:

I have just received dispatch from Dodge stating that the enemy have been driven from Glendale toward Bear Creek, our cavalry close upon them in pursuit. The enemy accomplished nothing but wounding a few men. General Dodge also states that the enemy showed themselves this morning and last night in considerable force on Tennessee River.

R. J. OGLESBY,

Major-General.

MEMPHIS, May 5, 1863.

I inclose herewith a short statement from Major-General Oglesby of the results of Dodge's expedition.* You will perceive that it has been thoroughly a success, so far as this command is concerned. There is more doubt of the success of the expedition from Rosecrans. The chief cause of failure in this, if it fail, will have been in the delay of a week, which intervened from the time they were to report at Hamburg to the time when they did report. By referring to my previous communications, you will perceive that the several movements indicated in them to be carried on by this command have been performed with a reasonable degree of accuracy, and with a very brilliant success in the main attempt to pierce the enemy's country.

The movement on Tuscumbia, on the one side, drew attention and gathered their cavalry in that direction; while the movement on Coldwater and Panola drew Chalmers and his band in th other. Thus our gallant soldier, Grierson, proceeded with his command unchallenged, and has splendidly performed the duty he was sent upon. I very earnestly support his claim for promotion, earned by long and meritorious service, and now crowned by this last achievement. I trust he will be able to join the main army below Grand Gulf; if not, he will go to Banks. In either event, he will be a gain to the part of the army he may join. If it be practicable, I strongly request that he and his command may be sent to me.

Your obedient servant,

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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*See Oglesby's report of May 3, p. 245.

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