War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0171 Chapter XXXV. PEGRAM'S EXPEDITION INTO KENTUCKY.

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Numbers 3. Reports of Brigadier General Mahlon D. Manson, U. S. Army.

LEBANON, March 25, 1863.

Rebels took Danville at 4 o'clock yesterday. Colonel [F.] Wolford made a gallant stand, but was driven back. Rebels said to be under command of Breckinridge. Estimated strength of rebel force, 12,000. I have no artillery, but will hold my position until rebels come in.

MAHLON D. MANSON,

Brigadier-General.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE.

LEBANON, March 27, 1863.

Eighty of the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry made a dash into Danville yesterday evening; drove in rebel pickets, capturing their guns. Returned this morning. Whole rebel force not over 2,500. First Georgia in Danville.

MAHLON D. MANSON,

Brigadier-General.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE.

LEBANON, March 29, 1863-6 a. m.

One hundred men of the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry took Danville yesterday evening, killing 1 man and capturing 15. Main rebel force yesterday, at 11 o'clock, at Lancaster, with 2,000 beeves. Train not in, and have received no orders. Had I not better move at once without baggage to Stanford, by way of Hustonville, to prevent them from crossing at Hall's Gap? I am all ready to move.

MAHLON D. MANSON,

Brigadier-General.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE.

Numbers 4. Report of Brigadier General John Pegram, C. S. Army, commanding expedition.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY BRIGADE,

Near Stigall's Ferry, Ky., April 1, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the expedition of my brigade into this State for the purpose of obtaining beef-cattle for the Confederate Army:On Sunday, the 22nd ultimo, I commenced crossing my command at this ferry, and early on Monday morning had the whole force, numbering about 1,550 cavalry and [G. A.] Huwald's battery of three pieces, on the north bank of the river. I immediately commenced a forced march over a very muddy road, and, moving nearly the whole night, reached and attacked Danville about 2 o'clock on the next day. The enemy, though numbering five regiments of infantry, one of cavalry, and seven pieces of artillery, after a slight resistance, retired from before the town, and commenced retreating by the road toward Camp Dick Robinson. We attacked their rear by charging them in the streets of Danville.