War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0166 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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Much to my disappointment, none of my corps have yet arriver. It is not known definitely whether this movement of the enemy is a raid or an invasion. I hope we will find no difficulty in holding the line of the Kentucky River, and as far in front of Louisville as Lebanon, until the arrival of re-enforcements, when we will try to drive them back. The troops in this department were necessarily very much scattered, but I shall concentrate them as soon as we get troops enough. I have requested reports from the Governors of the States as to the forces in process of organization. Can I have authority to order out such of them as are ready for the field? Would it not be well to send all the prisoners held in this department to the Eastern force? It will render available in the field a considerable force that is now on guard duty. Has anything been done toward the organization of the 20,000 Kentucky troops allowed by law of Congress?

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cincinnati, Ohio, March 29, 1863-7.15 p. m.

Our forces, under command of General Gillmore, attacked the enemy yesterday, and drove them from in front of Hickman's Bridge and across Duck River, in the direction of Crab Orchard. General Carter's cavalry is now in pursuit. I will telegraph more fully during the day.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.

CINCINNATI, OHIO,

March 30, 1863-10.30 p. m.

Our advance has driven all the enemy that is south of the Kentucky River to Somerset, and I hope to drive them out of Eastern Kentucky soon. You can scarcely realize how much we need the other division of the Ninth Corps. I have offered to send troops to Cox, on the Kanawha, if it is necessary. Although it is out of my department, I will help him all I can. I hope you will be able to send the other division very soon, which will, I think, enable me to make an important move, which I will explain by letter.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.

LOUISVILLE, KY., April 1, 1863-2.10 p. m.

After concentrating a portion of General Gillmore's force at Hickman's Bridgee, and a portion of General Boyle's at Lebanon, I ordered them to make a simultaneous attack on Saturday morning upon Pegram's command, which was at Danville and in that neighborhood, with a view to capturing his force or driving them over the Cumberland.

General Gillmore crossed the Kentucky, and drove that portion of the enemy in front of Hickman's Bridge across Duck River, they burning the bridge to prevent pursuit. On the same day a portion of General Manson's force from Lebanon took Danville, the remainder moving down through Hustonville to co-operate with General Gillmore. The enemy