War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0132 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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Numbers 5. Report of Captain William M. Flanagan, Third Ohio Cavalry.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALRY,

Camp Stanley, March 15, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the recent scout of the Third Ohio Volunteer Cavalry:Pursuant to orders, we marched on the morning of the 4th instant, at daylight, under command of Colonel Eli Long, of the Fourth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, commanding Second Cavalry Brigade. Taking the Salem pike, we marched about 10 miles in the direction of Unionville, a small village located on the Nashville and Shelbyville turnpike. On arriving within 2 miles of the village, we encountered the enemy's pickets, driving them in and following close upon their rear.

The enemy, occupying that place in force, fled in haste on hearing of our approach. They did not escape in time, however, to prevent a loss of 50 prisoners and their camp and garrison equipage, consisting of tents, cooking utensils, wagon, &c. Not being prepared t carry any of our captured property with us we remained in camp just long enough to destroy the same. Thence we were ordered toward Eagleville, on the Nashville and Shelbyville pike, where we bivouacked for the night, our horses under saddle,a s we anticipated the enemy might follow in our rear; but they were judicious enough to approach and reconnoiter in small squads, which sufficed, however, to keep us on the alert, with our arms by our side, during the night.

We were called up quietly the next morning at 4 o'clock, and went as silently as possible about our respective duties. After we had breakfasted we fell into line, and, learning the enemy were occupying Chapel Hill, we marched for that point at 12 m.

We reached Chapel Hill about 4 p. m., but only to find vacated camps, as General Steedman, with his brave and hardly soldiers, had routed the enemy, killing and capturing a large number. Weary and disappointed, we then fell into line, and, learning the enemy were occupying Chapel Hill, we marched for that point at 12 m.

We reached Chapel Hill about 4 p. m., but only to find vacated camps, as General Steedman, with his brave and hardly soldiers, had routed the enemy, killing and capturing a large number. Weary and disappointed, we then fell back to our encampment at Eagleville.

On the following morning we took up our line of march for Camp Stanely, but when 4 miles out were ordered to countermarch and proceed to Triune. From Triune we marched in the direction of Franklin, and, notwithstanding the roads were in bad condition from recent rains, we made a very expeditious march, encamping at night about 9 miles from Franklin. Resuming our march early next day, we reached Franklin about 12 m., where we encamped and remained over night.

Early next morning, with the First Brigade, we took the Maury County pike, and, traveling about 6 miles, turned to the left up a road leading up a narrow valley to Thompson's Station, expecting there to find the enemy in force; but, being disappointed in this, we marched 5 miles farther on, making a junction at Columbia pike with a heavy column of troops under command of General Granger. Taking the advance of the whole column, with the First Cavalry Brigade immediately in our rear, we started for Columbia, passing through Spring Hill, a point which the enemy's cavalry had just left, retiring toward Columbia. Be pressed them closely, skirmishing with them along the way without any casualties on our part. On arriving near Spring Creek we found the enemy strongly posted, guarding every for d and sopiting with spirit and energy our passage. After skirmishing for several hours with the enemy across the stream, we returned to camp for the night, the enemy still holding his position.

On the following day we were ordered to drive the enemy from his