War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0091 Chapter XXXV. ENGAGEMENT AT THOMPSON'S STATION, TENN.

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Pickands, so far as they came under my eye, did well. My orderly, [David O.] Brown, of the Nineteenth Michigan, Company B, did his duty all the day most faithfully and courageously.

I append a list of our killed, wounded, and missing in battle, showing the numbers of each. I refer to the reports of regimental commanders, herewith forwarded, for their names. I also append a list of those who died of exposure and cruel treatment by the enemy during captivity:

Wounded.

Command. Killed. Mortally Severely Slightly Missing

33rd Indiana. 17 14 32 37

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22nd 7

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19

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Wisconsin.

19th 20 13 42 37 1

Michigan.

85th Indiana. 13

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21

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9th

Pennsylvania 1 1

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5

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Cavalry.

2nd Michigan 2

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6 5

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Cavalry.

4th Kentucky

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Cavalry.

124th Ohio.

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18th Ohio

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Battery.

Total*. 60 28 120 84 1

CONTINUATION:

Total kil-

Command. led, woun- Died of Total. Remarks.

ded, and exposure.

missing.

33rd Indiana. 100 9 109 3 officers

22nd 26 16 42 2 officers

Wisconsin.

19th Michigan. 113 30 143

85th Indiana. 34 30 64 4 officers

9th

Pennsylvania 7

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7

Cavalry.

2nd Michigan 13

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13

Cavalry.

4th Kentucky

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No loss.

Cavalry.

124th Ohio.

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Do.

18th Ohio

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Do.

Battery.

Total*. 293 85 378

The losses of the enemy, I believe, were much more severe than ours, as they, by their repeated charges, over open ground, were much more exposed. We saw many of them killed and wounded. I believe the number would approximate 500. Among them Colonel [S. G.] Earle, of the Third Arkansas, and Captain [W. T.] Watson, General Armstrong's assistant adjutant-general.

I append a statement of occurrences during the time the officers were prisoners, believing it to be a legitimate matter of report.

After our surrender we were marched to Columbia, Tenn., and remained there during the night, the men without rations. On the next day, such was the scarcity of provisions, we had nothing but meat to eat, a pound a day being the ration. At night of the second day we bivouacked in the woods. The next morning we were furnished with a small quantity of bread, made of salt, water, and flour. This was the only bread furnished until our arrival at Shelbyville, two days after. Here we waited one day before receiving another small allowance of heavy, extemporized flour bread. Thanks to the Union women there, they courageously fed the famishing men, notwithstanding the continual insults of Southern gentlemen. A small ration of meat was regularly furnished. Two days' march from Shelbyville brought us to Tullahoma. This march was a terrible ene; the rain fell in torrents, the streams were swollen, and were waist-deep. The water was chilling, and the night air as cold as March is in its most inclement moods. The prisoners arrived at Tullahoma, General Bragg's headquarters, about sunset, and were marched to a muddy spot of ground, used as a mule-pen formerly, upon which were scattered, for fires, a few heaps of green oak logs. Nothing was there to sit down upon, or in any way to rest upon. There were buildings and woods near, but the men were denied their use. There was dry wood to be had, but it was refused also. The

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*See also revised statement, p. 75.

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