War of the Rebellion: Serial 034 Page 0074 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXV.

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MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., March 6, 1863-12 midnight.

Granger telegraphs as to the unfortunate affair in which Coburn's brigade was so cut up. Our loss, 50 killed, 200 wounded.* Rebel loss, 150 killed, 500 to 600 wounded. Rebels say our men fought desperately, and gave up only when surrounded. Information received to-day satisfies me they intend to fight us in Middle Tennessee, and that they will bring to bear upon us about 20,000 cavalry and mounted infantry. They are to-day superior to us in numbers. I am not, as you know, an alarmist, but I do not think it will do to risk as we did before. We know that they claimed 65,000 and the choice of ground on the morning before the battle of Stone's River. This read in general orders.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Murfreesborough, Tenn., March 25, 1863.

GENERAL: Inclosed I have the honor to transmit General Gilbert's report of the affair at Thompson's Station, on the Franklin and Columbia turnpike.

From all the papers, it appears that the column of Colonel Coburn, which consisted of 1,845 men, was pushed on the reconnaissance in face of Van Dorn's column of probably 7,500 men; that Colonel Coburn pushed them back the first day, and so alarmed them as to be able to encamp in their presence; that the next morning he pushed them before him until they reached Thompson's Station, where there was a natural pass for the road between hills; that here he pushed forward with a good deal of rashness, and, while fighting two Texas brigades in front, was surrounded by Forrest getting in his rear.

Our troops appear to have fought well and punished the rebels, but had not the pluck and vigor the charge the rebel cavalry and regain the main road.

The loss, as given by General Baird, is as follows:

Field and staff officers .................................... 13

Commissioned officers ....................................... 70

Privates .................................................... 1,323

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Total* ...................................................... 1,406

The rebel loss was about 50 killed and 150 wounded.

The causes of this loss, which was wholly unnecessary, appear to have been want of proper caution on the part of Colonel Coburn to feel his way and keep General Gilbert advised, and too much indecision on the part of the General Gilbert in either giving orders to Colonel Coburn to retire or going out at once to re-enforce him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

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*But see revised statement, p. 75.

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