War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 1120 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV

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[Inclosure No. 5.]

HEADQUARTERS SEMINOLE BATTALION,

Council House, Seminole Nation, June 6, 1863.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States:

SIR: We have learned with pleasure that the Indian country will again be created a separate department, to be composed of the troops raised in the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, Creek, and Seminole Nations, and believing as we do that the welfare of the soldier depends in a great measure on the conduct of his commander and having served under Brigadier General D. H. Cooper and found him ever active in doing the best for the troops in his command in the Indian country that could possibly be done for them, and believing, moreover, that his extensive acquaintance with the Indian people and their country would enable him to do more for their wants and defense than one not so well acquainted, we heartily unite with our friends the Creeks and others in recommending him for the appointment of major-general, to command the forces in the department when created; and feeling that due consideration will be given the matter by the proper department, we subscribe ourselves the President's most obedient, humble servants,

JOHN JUMPER,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Seminole Battalion,

GEORGE CLOUD,

Major,

GEORGE PATTERSO,

Adjutant,

AND OTHERS.

[Inclosure Numbers 6.]

PRAIRIE SPRINGS, CHEROKEE NATION,

June 21, 1863.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: It is with the greatest reluctance and disappointment that we are made to believe and understand from our lately returned delegate from Congress that other and more important propositions have been consulted and advised at Richmond than those so lately guaranteed and granted by a treaty of peace, friendship, and alliance betwixt a highly honored commissioner from the Confederate States and the Cherokee people at Tahlequah, no longer ago than September, 1861; and as the aforesaid proposition involves the very existence, welfare, and happiness of the Cherokee people, we do, therefore, on account of our good feelings toward the Confederate States and the Southern people, adopt this method of expressing to you our abhorrence of and earnest protest against any new scheme or form of policy that would conflict with any portion of our existing treaty obligations.

We deeply regret having to say to you that our delegate, in whom we placed full confidence and reliance, has, after a period of two years' warfare upon our country, returned to his people from the seat of your Government, after being received and accepted as a delegate from the Cherokee people to your Congress, and proposes for his own interest, and that of some of his friends, that we, the Cherokee people in council assembled, pass some law by which the introduction of white citizens from the Confederate States can be so effected as to give to each and