War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 1103 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE INDIAN TERRITORY,

Doaksville, December 20, 1863.

Brigadier-General COOPER:

GENERAL: General Steele has just heard, through a Choctaw, that there is, or has been lately, a body of Federals somewhere on the Kimishi, above this place. This Choctaw reports that the Federals, in force, were marching in this direction. General Steele desires that you should take the necessary steps to ascertain what truth there may be in these reports. The Choctaw who brought the report was sent to you by General Steele, with Adjutant Simons, of the Second Choctaw Regiment. It was difficult to communicate with the man, as he spoke very imperfect English.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. G. DUVAL,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE INDIAN TERRITORY,

Doaksville, December 20, 1863.

Brigadier General R. M. GANO, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs that, if you have not already begun a forward movement, you take up your line of march in this direction without delay. There is reason to believe that the Federals design moving down toward this place. He desires that you should keep him advised of your progress, and the condition, &c., of your command. You will please have a field return made out and forwarded to these headquarters upon the reception of this communication.

I have the honor to be, &c., respectfully,

B. G. DUVAL,

Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Richmond, Va., December 21, 1863.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States, Richmond, Va.:

Mr. PRESIDENT: I inclose to you copies of letters from Colonel Stand Watie, which, if you have time to read, may furnish some information concerning the Indian country. I am aware of the severe duties that engage your whole attention, or I should before now have called in person. The brigade authorized to be raised by Colonel Stand Watie would have been organized last summer but for the untimely advance of the enemy, who defeated and effectually cut off several companies raised by him in Arkansas, and which either were thrown into other companies or turned out on their own hook. Two regiments and four companies had directly reported to Colonel Watie. General Holmes assured me that General Steele had sadly disappointed him in his operations in the Indian country. I am sorry to say that he does not possess the confidence of the Indians, and regret that General Smith retains him in command of their country. He has abandoned their country and one-third of his own force.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. C. BOUDINOT,

Delegate, &c.