War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0983 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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General Walker, at 5 p.m., and that the latter is falling back. You will hold yourself in readiness to fall into of battle at any moment.

Yours, respectfully,

WM. A. SEAY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

(To Generals McRae, Parsons, Fagan, and Colonel Clark.)

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS PRICE'S DIVISION,

August 28, 1863.

The enemy having crossed the Bayou Meto at the Shallow Ford, the brigadier-general commanding division deems it advisable for you to strengthen your line of skirmishers and pickets.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

[L. A.] MACLEAN,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

(To Generals Parsons and Fagan and Colonel Clark.)

HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT, Shreveport, La., August 30, 1863.

Major General STERLING PRICE,

Little Rock, Ark.:

I am directed by Lieutenant-General Smith to say eight regiments of the enemy, it is believed, occupy Monroe. General Taylor has full information of their movements, and will make dispositions accordingly. Some time since a brigade of cavalry was ordered from his command to this place. On their arrival they will be sent forward to cover Camden. In mean while use all disposable transportation at your command to remove the stores from thence to Washington and Arkadelphia. The simultaneous movement of the enemy from different directions and General Smith's ill health detain him here.

Your obedient servant,

S. S. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

BONHAM, August 30, 1863.

Major G. M. BRYAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Trans-Mississippi Department:

MY DEAR SIR: I avail myself of the understanding between us when I left Marshall that I should write you in the event of the occurrence of anything new in the Indian Territory.

I have only arrived here this moment, and find,as I feared, that General Steele is being pushed rapidly down the country. He is now only about 60 miles from Red River (at East Boggy), or rather he was at the point indicated on the 28th instant. General Bankhead had not reached him; he must, however, be very near him. General Steel had been compelled soon after I left camp to send Cabell's brigade in the direction of Fort Smith,to avoid the contagion of demoralization. I have seen letters from General Steele as late as the 28th instant. I think from their tenor he will make a stand as soon as General Bankhead joins him;