War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0950 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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AUGUST 28, 1863.

Respectfully submitted to the President whose instructions for an early answer to General Smith are solicited. A courier will leave on Monday next.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

AUGUST 28, 1863

SECRETARY OF WAR:

In a recent letter to General Smith, I anticipated many of the points presented. My confidence in the discretion and ability of General Smith assures me that I shall have no difficulty in sustaining any assumption of authority, which may be necessary. Able heads of departments should be selected, and large discretion allowed.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MISSOURI CAVALRY

Camp Clay, near Cache River, July 29, 1863-12.30 p.m.

Brigadier General J. S. MARMADUKE:

GENERAL: Colonel Kitchen desired me to keep you informed of everything coming to my notice. A messenger has just arrived from Captain [J. R.] Henson (who was out scouting), and says he was sent back from Greensborough before daylight this morning. He was sent by Captain Henson to hurry Colonel Kitchen up with the balance of the men as he (Captain H.) had captured 3 wagons, 10 mules, and 2 horses. The wagons are all loaded with boxes (contents unknown). Colonel Kitchen met the messenger 5 miles beyond Cache River, and hurried his command forward to meet Captain H., who by that time must have reached the swamp. Captain H. also captured 3 men and 1 woman. The prisoners reported 500 Federals on the Ridge, 5 miles above Greensborough. Will dispatch again when the command arrives, or should I hear from Colonel Kitchen.

I am, respectfully,

JAMES [A.] WALKER,

Major, Commanding Tenth Missouri Cavalry,

Per R. D. KATHRENS,

Adjutant.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INDIAN TERRITORY,

Camp at Honey Springs, July 29, 1863

Major W. B. BLAIR,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I moved my camp to this place yesterday for convenience of grazing my animals. Should the enemy move out in force, I shall fall back to meet the re-enforcements coming from Texas. Genera Blunt is in command of the forces at Fort Gibson, or Fort Blunt, as they call it. He brought with him an accession of forces. He has now sixteen pieces of artillery, some as large as 12-pounders. My force here is about 2,500 white men and about 4,000 Indian troops, with four iron 6-pounders two mountain howitzers, and one rifled prairie gun (small). General Blunt has at least 5,000 of which 2,000 are white troops, and his Indian troops having had white officers appointed to them are better than ours, as well as better armed. From his fortified position he