War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0918 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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teries blown up, and the garrison surrendered on 3rd of July; that Johnston would fight the Federals at Jackson, Miss.,that Port Hudson was still ours. The inclosed papers will give you the rest of the news. I forgot to state that the letter said Lee had fought Meade's army in Pennsylvania; routed him, wounded Meade; killed 4 generals. No news from the front. Burbridge reports (July 8) all quiet. Federal cavalry had left Patterson, part going to Cape Girardeau, part to Bloomfield. Thinks they are sending troops out of the State. I shall get timely information of an advance from the North. Don't fail to let me know of the movements (Federal) if any up White or Arkansas Rivers. Greene is now camped 3 miles from here. Shelby (when I learned there was nothing threatening from the north) was ordered to camp near Augusta, and consume the corn (quartermaster's and commissary) which was spoiling from the late rains. There is forage and subsistence sufficient for Greene at this place for a number of days.

I have no means of sending off anything from this post. All steam and ferry boats, except two flats, have been sent to Des Arc. Generals Holmes and Price should know this. All are getting along well here.

Very respectfully,

J. S. MARMADUKE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S. - The fall of Vicksburg may to some extent alter the position of forces in this district; if so, I beg to remind the general that there are valuable stores at this post-quartermaster's, commissary, and ordnance.

CAMP AT RUSSELL'S FERRY, July 10, 1863

Major HENRY EWING,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Jacksonport, Ark:

MAJOR: In accordance with your orders, I forwarded to you every day a report of the movements of the enemy in the direction of Ironton,&c. I directed all my dispatches to the care of post quartermaster at Jacksonport, and, if you have not received them, it is his fault or the courier line south of that point. Brigadier-General Davidson left Ironton on the 30th of June, and marched with the greater part of his troops in the direction of Cape Girardeau. He camped near Fredericktown on July 2. Whether it is his intention to go to Cape Girardeau or to Bloomfield my scouts cannot as yet determine. I am inclined to think that the enemy are concentrating at Bloomfield, and will make that point a base of operations. There is one regiment, 800 strong, at Bloomfield at this time. They entered that town about two weeks ago, and brought with them a train of 30 wagons, loaded with supplies. The wagons immediately returned to the Cape, from which point they will be compelled to transport their supplies,&c. One regiment is now building a bridge across the Mingo. This stream empties into the Saint Francis about 16 miles from Poplar Bluff. I think this bridge is only for the purpose of keeping communication open between Ironton and Bloomfield. There are now at Ironton about 1,000 troops, mostly militia. Colonel Jake Hill (a big buck negro) has established his headquarters at that place, and is recruiting a regiment of American citizens of African descent. The Federal outposts are about 10 miles from Patterson, and can be very easily captured, if the general will only give me permission.

Davidson's men say that they are going to Helena, down Crowley's Ridge. There are about 2,500 Federal at New Madrid. They are pre-