War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0899 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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CAMP ON BIG CREEK, ARKANSAS,

June 30, 1863.

Major THOMAS L. SNEAD,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Price's Division:

MAJOR: I have just crossed Big Creek with the infantry and artillery. General McRae now crossing. It will be night before our trains are over. The crossing is bad enough, and the route through prairie was very distressing on the teams. I deem it impossible to get nearer Moro Creek this evening. I have, therefore, gone into camp.

Very respectfully,

M. M. PARSONS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Shreveport, La., July 1, 1863.

Lieutenant JOHN W. DUNNINGTON, C. S. Navy,

Commanding Gunboat Pontchartrain, Little Rock, Ark.:

SIR: In answer to your communication of the 23rd ultimo, * in relation to mechanics, &c., for the gunboat Pontchartrain, I am directed by Lieutenant General E. Kirby Smith, commanding the Trans-Mississippi Department, to say it has been referred to Lieutenant-General Holmes, commanding the District of Arkansas, with the following indorsement:

Respectfully referred to Lieutenant-General Holmes, who will order from his command the detail asked for by Lieutenant Dunnington, and will also offer him such facilities in the other matters requested as the supplies on hand and the exigencies of the service will admit of.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

S. S. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Trenton, July 1, 1863.

Major General STERLING PRICE:

GENERAL: I deeply regret the difficulties that cause the delay in your march. I have used every precaution to prevent a knowledge of our approach reaching the enemy, and have what I believe to be certain information that I had succeeded up to night before last. I fear these terrible delays will thwart all my efforts. Let me beseech you, therefore, to hasten forward as rapidly as possible consistently with the good order and efficiency of our command.

General Marmaduke's suggestions are wise, and he acted well in leaving Greene's brigade. Please advise him that there are two spies (Stuart and Haliman) out from Helena, and it is of the first importance that they should be captured, and also that he should dispose of his scouts and pickets in the best manner to prevent any person going to Helena. Fagan has been here three days, and will not move until to-morrow morning, when he will take a position on Lick Creek, 10 miles from Helena. I am most anxious to see and confer with you, and will leave here early to-morrow morning, to meet you at McGrew's, some 6 or 8 miles this side of Spring Creek, on your road. Please inform me if I

* Not found.