War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0886 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV.

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to the scene of action, and to whatsoever in your judgment you may deem best to accomplish the immense result of saving Vicksburg and our communications with your department.

I am, very truly, yours,

J. E. JOHNSTON.

[P. S.] -An intelligence officer, who brought dispatches from General Pemberton, expresses confidence that if your troops could send in abundance of cattle, and themselves (8,000) join the garrison, the place would be saved.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Clarendon, June 26, 1863.

General STERLING PRICE, Commanding Column:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I deeply regret your misfortune. Please inform me immediately on the receipt of this your exact condition, your ability to proceed, and what are the probable obstacles you will have to contend with, where General Marmaduke is, and where he will join you.

I am, general, very respectfully,

TH. H. HOLMES,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MARMADUKE'S DIVISION,

Switzer's June, 26, 1863.

Major [L. A.] MACLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: Shelby's and Greene's brigade and trains have arrived safely at this point. They will camp to-night some 3 or 4 miles from this point, on road to Helena. No news from Helena, nor of General Holmes.

My headquarters will be at this point until to-morrow morning, and orders will reach me here. My troops will remain in their camp of to-night until further orders from General Price. Please send me any letters or papers for me or my division.

Very respectfully,

J. S. MARMADUKE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS McRAE'S BRIGADE,

Camp Cache River, June 26, [1863] -9 p. m.

Major [L. A.] MACLEAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Price's Division:

MAJOR: I am under the necessity of informing you that it is utterly impossible to get my train across Cache. None of my commissary or regimental wagons and but two ordnance wagons have arrived. My battery is over all safe, except the battery wagon, which is mired. The way this side of the bridge is entirely impassable for wagons until it is cross-laid, which cannot be done to-night, as my men are worn out. I have had 200 men on fatigue there since 6 o'clock. The mud is so deep on this side of the bridge that mules cannot stand up, and it is so dark in the bottom that men can neither see to work nor drive.

I have the honor to be, major, very respectfully,

D. McRAE,

Brigadier-General.