War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0817 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC- CONFEDERATE.

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HDQRS. GREENE'S BRIGADE, MARMADUKE'S DIVISION,

TRANS- MISSISSIPPI ARMY,

April 12, 1863.

Major HENRY EWING,

Assistant Adjutant- General:

MAJOR: I inclose a dispatch from Captain Reves.* I am using every exertion to put the command in marching condition. I am somewhat delayed by want of iron, the necessity of accumulating forage, &c., and transporting stores from Powhatan. I inquired how many days' cooked rations will be taken on the march. I want this information, because it will require much time to prepare them after the cooking utensils are sent off.

There are only two sets of harness to the battery. I shall rig up wagon harness for the leaders. I shall have trouble to get suitable battery horses.

You will inform me when I may look for Colonel Young, and where he is now camped. I wish to communicate with him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

COLTON GREENE,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE INDIAN TERRITORY,

Fort Smith, Ark., April 13, 1863.

Brigadier General D. H. COOPER,

Commanding First Brigade:

GENERAL: I disapprove entirely of the expedition proposed by Colonel De Morse, for the reason that all the troops belonging to the Indian district will be required in another direction. When that regiment was sent on the duty in which it is now engaged, I only looked upon it as a temporary measure of relief to the inhabitants of Cooke and the contiguous counties. I do not feel that I have forces to spare from the more important duty of keeping back the enemy (who is even now menacing our line of defense), and, if possible, of driving him back beyond the limits of the Indian country. Neither do I think it well to send out an expedition at this time to subdue the wild tribes; it is not to be accomplished by one expedition, but would be required to be followed up vigorously. We have enough upon our hands at this time yearly occurrence, and should have been put down with a strong hand long since but for the present war. We cannot spare troops to do more than give protection to the frontier settlements.

The remarks on the subject of discharges are entirely unnecessary. If a man is physically unable to perform his duties, a medical officer who is fit for his position can make such a statement of his case as will insure the concurrence of the medical director. Many of the medical staff that I have encountered are extremely ignorant, and sometimes (I have known one case) will take pay for a certificate; consequently, as all the officers cannot be known to the commander, it is necessary to work by rule, and submit every certificate to competent authority, and let it stand upon its own merits. I desire that you should concentrate as soon as possible all of our brigade, except a few Texas companies.

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*Not found.

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52 R R- VOL XXII, PT II