War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0749 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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PILOT KNOB, MO., December 23, 1863.

General FISK:

GENERAL: It is reported to me to-day that Centreville was attacked and captured yesterday by Reves, 200 strong, and that the immediately retreated south. I have a battalion on his trail to-day.

R. G. WOODSON,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., December 23, 1863.

Colonel R. G. WOODSON:

I cannot see how Reves could get at Centreville without the knowledge of Captain Leeper. I can't credit the report. You will at once organize an expedition that will go in search of Reves, and follow him. It seems to me that with proper vigor he might be exterminated or driven out of Southeastern Missouri. You have sufficient force to enable you to keep after him until he will trouble us no more.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

NOTE.-The expedition is already on the road.

R. G. WOODSON,

Colonel, Commanding.

PILOT KNOB, MO., December 23, 1863.

Lieutenant W. T. CLARKE,

Aide-de-Camp:

In answer to yours of this date, I have to state that at present I am unable to give many particulars. My information of the catastrophe at Centreville comes from a citizen living near. He states that Reves (estimated at from 200 to 400) came into Centreville yesterday about 2 o'clock, completely surprising the garrison, taking them all prisoners, and again immediately moved out to the south.

R. G. WOODSON,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Jefferson City, Mo., December 24, 1863.

Major OLIVER D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that, in accordance with the order received yesterday by telegraph, I have concentrated the troops in this district at Otterville, Sedalia, and Warrensburg, with a battalion at Warsaw and five companies at Clinton, leaving small guards at Lexington, Marshall, and Tipton (this does not include the troops at this post, two companies of infantry and three of cavalry); also leaving one company of cavalry at Linn Creek. Scouts have been ordered south of the Osage, as far as Stockton and Lamar, and military expresses, with relays of horses every 15 miles, between the Osage River and three different telegraph offices at the west, established. If the enemy "means business," we will be ready for him but the reported return of Quantrill