War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0664 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV

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SAINT LOUIS, MO.,

October 18,. 1863-11.30 a.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have directed General Steele to send to Memphis all the troops he can spare, retaining only enough for the defense of the line of the Arkansas River. I will send one regiment and a battery from Saint Louis, and probably more in a short time. I have nearly made an end of Shelby's raiders.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, October 18, 1863-11 a.m.

Major-General STEELE, Little Rock:

The General-in-Chief directs that if any troops can be spared from your command they be sent to Memphis. Please send all you can spare, retaining only enough for defense of the line of the Arkansas River. We must suspend aggressive operations until Rosecrans gains his point.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

LEBANON, MO., October 18, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

GENERAL: I have just received reliable information that the rebels, 400 or 500 strong, marched into Buffalo this morning at daylight, and took possession of the town. At 9 o'clock this morning about 200 rebels crossed the Springfield road 20 miles west of this place, from the direction of Hartville, and have doubtless joined those at Buffalo. I think it likely that they will attack this place. There are 80 effective men of my regiment and about 50 Enrolled Militia here. May I burn the Government property in case I am overpowered? It consists of valuable clothing, quartermaster's stores of every kind, and a large amount of commissary stores. The trains of the post, with Colonel Morton, are on the road. General McNeil and Colonel Morton have all my regiment with them except the 80 men. Morton divided his forces at Linn Creek the 17th, and moved west with cavalry and east with the infantry.

J. J. GRAVELY,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., October 18, 1863-7.30 p.m.

J. J. GRAVELY,

Colonel, Commanding Lebanon:

I do not think it can possibly be necessary to destroy the stores at Lebanon. By making an obstinate fight you can hold out until re-enforcements reach you, and do the rebels far more damage than they can you. Morton is probably now after them, though I have heard nothing from him. Send messengers to him at once, with orders to pursue the rebels; also inform General McNeil, if possible. I will try and send a force from Rolla.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.