War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0598 MO.,ARK.,KANS.,IND.T.,AND DEPT.N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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KANSAS CITY, MO., October 3, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Saint Louis:

Reports from Liberty, by Van Horn, who saw Colonel Moss, and brought letter from him, saying he has issued one hundred arms in Clay and two hundred and fifty in Platte, and that no men have been ordered off, or driven off, or killed or threatened by his men. Van Horn could learn nothing there of acts of violence, but is convinced that Moss is arming rebels and sympathizers, and thereby arousing the passions of Union men, who will not go into the organization. From Leavenworth extravagant reports, given by Summers and Steele, of Parkville, Hallett and Baker, of Farley, who say they fled from fear, and assert that one hundred and fifty families fled from Parkville; in fact, I think but three or four have gone. Fitzgerald's provisional company say they were disbanded for refusing to obey Moss, and many of them have gone to Leavenworth and entered the Fifteenth, and they are responsible for much of the exaggeration. I think Moss, by receiving disloyal men, has driven all the radicals out of the organization, and the affair is assuming a party complexion, and that's what's the matter! I have sent Moss copies of my two former telegrams and Captain Joy's report. Will telegraph reports from Farley, Weston, and Platte City. No excitement at Leavenworth now.

THOMAS EWING, Jr.,

Brigadier-General.

KANSAS CITY, MO., October 3, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Saint Louis:

Reports from Platte City, Weston, and Farley. Forty or fifty families [have left] from fear of being forced into militia organization, or of personal violence, or from disgust. Notices to quit shown in Leavenworth, alleged to come from Moss' men. No proof. A general belief among loyal men that a majority in the organization not only have been, but still are, rebels. The feeling is so violent among Union men in Platte against the policy of arming men of rebel reputation, and is so strongly and universally sympathized with in Kansas, that I fear serious evil will result.

THOMAS EWING, Jr.,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Harrisonville, Mo., October 3, 1863.

Commanding Officer, Pleasant Hill:

SIR: I have information that Quantrill, with 500 or 600 men, came into Rose Hill yesterday, and plundered, tore up, and burned everything obnoxious to him; also that 100 of his men took dinner with Coleman, a farmer living on Big Creek. About the same number with Gates. They were having a big, high burning in that vicinity. As to the number, I think it is exaggerated, but I believe he was there, and that some of his men were seen on Big Creek to-day by my informant. Quantrill reports himself as on his road south. I have scouts out south and southwest. A party of Ladds, from this station, who were foraging, were fired