War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0590 MO.,ARK.,KANS.,IND.T.,AND DEPT.N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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well for the companies of the Eleventh to remain with General Brown until next month. The companies of the Fourth with me are widely scattered.

THOMAS EWING, Jr.,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTHERN MISSOURI,

Macon, Mo., October 2, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Saint Louis, Mo.:

Your last two dispatches were not received until this morning. I interrogated Colonel [John F.] Williams especially in regard to reports concerning Moss. He advised me that they are wholly without foundation. I have the same advice from other sources. I can assure you, general, that there is no shadow of truth in these reports, no matter what all Kansas may say on the subject. This is but part of the preconcerted scheme to carry the day at Washington. The lie told, of course will be persisted in. If Lane, Jennison, Ray, and company are to determine who are loyal men in Missouri, you and I, of course, would be driven from the ranks. It strikes me this is a strange censorship the people of Kansas propose to exercise over Missouri; especially so when it is done under the leadership and advice of Jim Burnes, who has been a consistent and unfaltering rebel, with the oath of loyalty undigested in his craw, up to six weeks since, and Price, whom I know received several thousand dollars in the way of bribes for releasing rebel prisoners while in command at Weston.

I received a dispatch from General Ewing last evening. He expresses no confidence in the reports, but say that these scoundrels, Burnes and Price, made speeches in Leavenworth the night before, counseling the Kansas people that it might become necessary to invade Missouri. The same men, I understand, actually invaded Kansas in 1856 from Missouri.

My officers are most of them out. My adjutant is absent, but he will be up to-day. I will go to-morrow, and you may rest assured that no rebel has or will be armed, and no law-abiding, peaceable citizen will be driven out; but men who burn houses over the heads of helpless women and children and outrage the persons of innocent and unprotected girls will be exterminated, if found, though they die shouting for the Union.

O. GUITAR,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTHERN MISSOURI,

Macon, Mo., October 2, 1863.

Brigadier General THOMAS EWING, Jr.,

Kansas City, Mo.:

The statement that Colonel Moss is arming rebels and driving out Union men from Missouri is a base and damnable fabrication, concocted in aid of the designs of the conspirators in Missouri and Kansas. Can it be possible that the truly loyal and patriotic men of Kansas will take counsel at the hands of such men as Burnes and Price? The former an original and oath-bound traitor; the latter having been charged while in command at Weston with releasing rebels from prison for bribes, and at least one of whom, I understand, invaded Kansas from Missouri in 1856. Can it be possible that the peace and good neighborhood of these two