War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0481 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

No. 89.

Saint Louis, Mo., August 27, 1863.

Men belonging to the Enrolled Militia of Missouri, in active service, are permitted, by the order of the Governor of Missouri, to enlist in United States volunteer regiments. But to prevent abuse, it is ordered that when such men are duly enlisted, their names, with the company to which they belong, and a certificate of their enlistment, shall be sent by the recruiting officer to the colonel of their regiment, with the request for their discharge. The colonel will order their discharge from his regiment provided there be no charges against them. But if they are charged with any offense they will not be discharged, but will be held for trial and punishment. No militia-man so enlisted will leave his militia company until he shall receive his discharge from the colonel of his regiment. Without such discharge his enlistment in a volunteer regiment will be regarded null and void.

By command of Major-General Schofield:

C. W. MARSH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,

Pilot Knob, Mo., August 27, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Commanding Department of Missouri, Saint Louis:

From the best information I can get from my returned expedition, and from intercepted letters, I judge that a vigorous effort will be made by the Missouri rebels, under lead of Governor Tom Reynolds, to gather all the force they can muster, from conscripts and volunteers, for an army of invasion on Southeast Missouri. Our force in this district will be very light to hold the post and resist invaders, but I will put every man I have on the very best possible war footing and do the best I can.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,

Pilot Knob, Mo., August 27, 1863.

Major MONTGOMERY,

Bloomfield, Mo.:

The capture of Jeff. Thompson, the Swamp Fox, will call all the little foxes in the southeast from their holes. They will undertake to match us in some way. Be on the alert constantly; keep every man and horse on a war footing. Take no guerrillas prisoners, and there are no regular Confederate soldiers in this district now. In what condition are your earthworks? Sumter has fallen. The old flag which floated from its parapet when the brave General Anderson was forced to surrender to the Charleston devils, had been planted on the ruins of the fort by General Gillmore. Praise God for that! We shall soon hear of the fall of Charleston.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

31 R R-VOL XXII, PT II