War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0406 MO., ARK., KANS., IND.T., AND DEPT. N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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In relation to the apprehended difficulties in Nebraska, I wrote to Sully before he left Sioux City to ascertain whether there was any danger south of the Missouri, and if so, to march his command on the north side of the river and cover the settlements as he moved north. He replied that there was no danger, nor has he ever intimated that there were any indian troubles in Nebraska since, though I have heard from him several times at Sioux City, Fort Randall, and Fort Pierre. Nebraska, as your know, is not in my department.

Sully's route is now not even 1,200 strong, and I cannot reduce it and accomplish what is desired. The Seventh Iowa Cavalry has, however, been sent to General Schofield, and can take the place of the Nebraska regiment now with Sully.

A few days longer and all these matters will be plainly developed. I only give you here my reasons for the course I have taken, and for believing it will prove the wise one.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, July 27, 1863.

Colonel T. J. HAINES,

Aide-de-Camp and Commissary of Subsistence, Saint Louis:

On the 25th instant, Captain J. Carpenter, Second Arkansas Cavalry, left in charge of stores at Buchanan, burned them and fell back here. Destroyed about 45,000 pounds of bacon.

M. W. McCRACKEN,

Captain and Commissary of Subsistence.

PILOT KNOB, July 27, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

I am advised from Fredericktown that a company of cavalry left by General Davidson at Hog-Eye, Wayne County, guarding subsistence stores, were attacked by guerrillas on Saturday night, the 25th instant. Our forces burned the stores and retreated to Cape Girardeau. Colonel Rogers telegraphs me that he thinks it a big scare. He may look for a pretty big, strong force of raiders from the Pitman's Ferry and Pocahontas route after General Davidson passes through George County, Arkansans. The general left Gainesville on the morning of the 23rd instant.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF SOUTHEASTERN MISSOURI, Pilot Knob, July 28, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis:

The abandonment of Hog-Eye (Buchanan on the map), and the burning of the supplies by Captain Carpenter, has the appearance of having been very disgraceful and cowardly. The captain and his company are now safe in Cape Girardeau. I suppose I have no authority in the premises, as it occurred within General Davidson's jurisdiction.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.