War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0401 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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by all the Apache, Arapaho, and Kiowa Indians, and not knowing to which tribe he belonged, our position was rather unpleasant, owing to not having many troops here; and, as the Indians had been troublesome on the Santa Fe road, I had out on scout some 50 or our small garrison to protect trains above and below on the river. As soon as this Indian was killed, I sent runners out for all the scouts to return to this post, and called a council of all the chiefs. By 8 a.m. the chiefs (principal chiefs) were here. As I had told the runners to inform the chiefs I did not want any braves or other Indians to visit the post, all kept away by the Kiowas; they could not be governed by their chiefs, and came up in strong force, and very much excited; more so than any Indians I ever saw. Upon examination of the dead Indian by the chiefs, it was found to be a Cheyenne; they happened to be in small numbers, and we happily escaped a collision for the moment. What may happen it is impossible for me to say.

The Fort Lyon mail is in, and the messenger informs me that he applied for an escort to the mail to the commanding officer of a company of the First Colorado Cavalry, which was stationed about 65 miles this side of Fort Lyon, but he refused to send a man with him; said he had positive orders not to do so. What does all this mean? Am I expected to guard and escort trains on the whole of this road, for 400 miles, with but one company of cavalry? Captain Rad's company, of the Ninth Kansas Volunteers, will do all that men can do, but it is impossible for them to do justice to themselves and the service, in these 400 miles, alone. There are plenty of troops at Forts Lyon and Colorado,to protect this road, if properly managed. The whole of the road from Council Grove to the New Mexico border should be under the direction of one officer. Unless this is so, duty on it will not be properly done in some parts of it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. LEAVENWORTH,

Colonel Second Regiment Colo. Vols., Commanding Route on Santa Fe Road.

HEADQUARTERS OF TROOPS ON THE SANTA FE ROAD, Fort Larned, Kans., July 22, 1863.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, DIST. OF THE BORDER, Kansas City, Mo.:

SIR: The Fort Lyon mail is just in, and I have received a note from Lieutenant Colonel S. F. Tappan, First Colorado Cavalry, stating that his sending me re-enforcements when I was so fearfully menaced by the Indians a few days since has been excepted to by the colonel commanding the District of Colorado, and that he has been relieved from the command of Fort Lyon in consequence. If such is the fact, I ask as a great favor of the general commanding this district that he will so represent our matters out here to General Schofield as will not restore Colonel Tappan to his former command, but place his post,and the whole of the Santa Fe road, without the District of Colorado, if Colonel J. M. Chivington is to command it any longer. Inclosed I have the honor to send, for the information of the general commanding the District of the Border, extracts of two letters the Headquarters of the District of Colorado,* showing the limited knowledge they must possess of our situation on the Santa Fe road. Five hundred miles distance for troops to

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*Not found.

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26 R R-VOL XXII, PT II