War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0394 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV

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main river depot,180 miles from the army in the field, total distance for wagon supplies 305 miles; almost the whole of the latter (180 miles) through a country beset by the enemy, and without a single intermediate station of friendly troops, but small escort for trains, and, in case of disaster, hardly a company for re-enforcement from this post. Force at the extreme point being subsisted: Present troops, about 4,000; an equal number probably of refugees, mostly Indians, old men, women, and children.

H. Z. CURTIS,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-Enemy's forces at the other end of the line, preparing to attack Fort Gibson, reported at 13,000, probably in all 10,000, under Steele, Cabell, and Cooper.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., July 24, 1863.

Major [H. Z.] CURTIS,

Fort Scott, via Kansas City:

If the force in front of General Blunt is as large as he supposes, he is too far in advance. General Grant will send a force up Arkansas and White Rivers in a short time. Those rivers are the natural lines of operation in Arkansas.

As those expedition are to start soon, it would be folly to send re-enforcements to General Blunt. He must regulate his movements by those of the main forces.

Forward this to General Blunt.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

PILOT KNOB, July 24, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

Colonel Woodson, Third Missouri State Militia Cavalry, has just returned from a scout through the counties of Reynolds, Shannon, Carter, Oregon, and Ripley, marching nearly 250 miles in seven days. Has brought in 22 murderous horse-thieves, Confederate soldiers, and other outlaws, with their horses and arms. Found the country very quiet.

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Vicksburg, Miss., July 24, 1863.

Major General STEPHEN A. HURLBUT,

Commanding Sixteenth Army Corps:

I am sending Kimball's division to Helena. These are the only troops I have, not worn out with long and fatiguing marches through the dust and heat. In addition to this division, I will send several regiments that are the most reduced by sickness to Memphis, thus enabling you to take well regiments for field service.

I am so far away, and know nothing of Price's movements, except what is contained in the dispatches forwarded by you, that I shall instruct the troops going to Helena and those now there to report to you