War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0367 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. CAVALRY DIVISION, DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI,

Bloomfield, Mo., July 13, 1863.

Major General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis:

Information obtained by one of Glenn's men from a captured lieutenant of Kitchen's regiment to-day. Price crossed from Jacksonport to Crowley's Ridge, by a good road, 40 miles. He had no intention of holding Helena; merely attacked for supplies. Has now on the ridge six brigades of infantry, 2,000 each. Marmaduke has 7,000 cavalry. If we do not advance, Price proposes to attack us here. His present object is to draw us across the Saint Francis, and then assail our rear. Two regiments of Burbridge's brigade are at Chalk Bluff, and 6 miles below. Burbridge can concentrate his brigade from Pocahontas to the bluff in twenty-four hours.

Rebels are fully aware of the nature and strength of this command. We are all right.

J. W. DAVIDSON,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTH DISTRICT OF MISSOURI,

Saint Joseph, Mo., July 13, 1863.

Brigadier General ODON GUITAR,

Macon City, Mo.:

SIR: I have received the order placing you in command of Northern Missouri, but I have received no order to report to you. I presume, however, that I should do so; hence I write this letter.

The condition of this district, except Livingston, Andrew, Holt, and Atchison Counties, I believe to be good. Colonel [John B.] Hale informs me that Livingston County will give me no more trouble. Colonel [Bennett] Pike informs me that Holt and Atchison Counties are becoming more quiet. Andrew County is in a very bad condition. I have now in that county one company of the Third Provisional Regiment, commanded by Captain [James] Stotts, and one company and 25 men of the Eleventh Missouri Cavalry. I have also ordered Captain [Jacob] Woodruff's company to Andrew County.

The officers and men profess great anxiety to arrest the guilty parties in Andrew County,but say they cannot discover them. The truth is, the people are so alarmed that they dare not inform. I am laboring to quiet this alarm, and hope an expect in a short time to be successful.

Very respectfully,

WILLARD P. HALL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE FRONTIER,

In the Field, Fort Blunt, July 13, 1863.]

[Major H. Z. CURTIS?]:

DEAR MAJOR: We arrived here early on the morning of the 11th, and took them all by surprise. The Arkansas River is high, but falling. I am constructing three large flat-boats (ferries),and shall have them ready to commence crossing on Wednesday night, the 15th. The enemy has retired from his position on the river, their tents, which were visible from here, having disappeared in the last few days. They