War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0194 MO.,ARK.,KANS.,IND.T.,AND DEPT.N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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confidence in your judgment with your peculiar command, I would rather have you stay at present.

Telegraph and importune! I will. It is already 2nd of April. Inform me as soon as the wires are working.

WM. A. PHILLIPS,

Colonel, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

No. 12.

Milwaukee, Wis., April 2, 1863.

I. Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Myers, U. S. Army, having reported at these headquarters, in accordance with orders from the War Department, is assigned to duty as chief quartermaster, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

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By command of Major-General Pope:

R. O. SELFRIDGE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,]

April 3, 1863.

General BLUNT,

Leavenworth:

Put only very reliable troops on border counties. Missourians fear the "Red Legs" will have too much license under your command. That band of rascals must be checked. Better, as far as possible, have Missouri troops in Missouri, so far as Jackson and Cass Counties are concerned. Encourage Enrolled Militia, and treat them kindly.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, April 3, 1863.

Brigadier General BEN. LOAN, Jefferson City:

GENERAL: I have just finished your report on Windsor's papers, which is rich and racy. I have allowed him to go scot-free to Jefferson, but I agree with you that the Government can find plenty of more reliable agents. I do not know that I acted wisely in turning over the west tier of counties to Blunt's command. I supposed Jackson County was so near Leavenworth he could take better care of it. I would like to have your views. Blunt avows his determination to put down the "Red Legs," and it seems to me necessary that each of the adjacent commander should have a cordial understanding and cross lines whenever a real necessity exists. Of course, I want no such marches for the purpose of plunder, and hope that none but good, orderly troops will operate in that vicinity. The order does not interfere with the free action of the State troops, as General Vaughan still commanders the Enrolled Militia as before.

You sent an order of General Vaughan, and subsequently a letter of instructions from Governor Gamble, taking the ground that the Enrolled Missouri Militia should obey no laws but those of the State. I referred the Governor's letter to him for correction, and he properly did so in relation to ignoring all other laws.