War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0184 MO.,ARK.,KANS.,IND.T.,AND DEPT.N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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[Indorsement.]

SAINT LOUIS, March 31, 1863.

Respectfully referred to headquarters, Washington, for information. I have directed the general to visit the perpetrators with death and destruction if he can catch them. They deserve summary punishment, and I hope they will have it meted out to them.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., March 30, 1863.

President LINCOLN:

General Schofield is here. Please order him to Washington immediately.

H. R. GAMBLE,

Governor.

[DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,]

March 30, 1863.

General BARTHOLOW,

Glasgow:

All right. I am misinformed as to the locality of Sibley's Landing. I had telegraphed Loan, who has, no doubt, telegraphed commanders everywhere. Death to bushwhackers is the order. Have a commission always ready to try, determine, and execute immediately, if they are unfortunately taken alive.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Greenfield, Mo., March 30, 1863.

Colonel WILLIAM F. CLOUD,

Commanding Southwestern District of Missouri:

COLONEL: I have the honor to present to your consideration the condition of affairs hereabouts and the operations of my command.

It is manifest that there has been, in the last week, quite an influx of guerrillas in this vicinity, particularly to the west of Greenfield. Several new bands, but under old leaders, have appeared within the last few days, and they exhibit unusual activity and much familiarity with the country and their sympathizers. The Horse Creek region is 12 or 15 miles west of this. It is there they most frequently appear. The country is open, and a spy is easily stationed on an eminence commanding the country for miles in every direction. This prevents us from getting on to them suddenly.

On Saturday last, I chased a band of about 10 or 12 from this creek to Bear Creek, in Cedar County. There the pursuit became so hot they were forced to stand, rather than scatter. We charged them immediately, but, owing to the dense brush and jaded condition of our horses, we were unable to fall on them precipitately. The result was, they scattered in great confusion, and every devil of them struck for his destiny. We ran one down and killed him outright, capturing his horse and arms; others seemed wounded, but the thick brush prevented pursuit, and it already being dark, they made good their escape. We bivouacked on the ground, and scoured the country thoroughly, but made no discovery. Our casualties were 1 horse killed and 1 saber lost, and about 6 horses run down in the chase.