War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0182 MO.,ARK.,KANS.,IND.T.,AND DEPT.N.W. Chapter XXXIV.

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The weather has been fine, and the roads are getting road. Stock reduced; indeed, at the post of Fayetteville, very much reduced.

The report of the Arkansas command, Colonel Harrison, shows several things I have been trying to correct. I believe Colonel Harrison does the best he can with it, and I hope that a more rigid discipline may be gradually introduced.

I am 11 miles from Prairie Grove. I have a command now at Dutch Mills, and an outpost at Dripping Springs, and one 15 miles from Clarksville. These are mere reconnaissances.

Very respectfully,

WM. A. PHILLIPS,

Colonel, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Berryville, Ark., March 29, 1863.

Major General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD,

Commanding Army of the Frontier,

Saint Louis, Mo., or at this headquarters:

Your dispatch of the 25th instant received, but behind time. After much difficulty, I have succeeded in crossing White River, it being swollen by rains. I had completely exhausted forage on north side. My advance at Carrollton has captured some rebels, and from them and others learn than 300 or 400 are concentrating at Crooked Creek, between Carrollton and Yellville. They are committing all sorts of atrocities on Union people.

To-morrow early I will march to Carrollton, and next day attack them with a part of the force. The remainder I will keep at Carrollton, foraging. My only fear is Marmaduke getting from Batesville in my rear. You, however, will see to that. I have found more forage here than I expected, and think I can live in country a few days. We have already captured several leading guerrillas.

WM. WEER,

Colonel, Commanding Division.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Camp at Berryville, Ark., March 29, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel KENT,

Commanding Troops at Forsyth:

I am in receipt of a telegraphic communication from Major-General Schofield, which attaches the troops under your command to my division temporarily. I send you the usual order in such cases. I propose to leave you at full liberty to discharge, as in your opinion best, the duties of your command, as I presume the attaching was made in consequence of the fact that I am ordered south of White River. You will, therefore, simply at present carry out such instructions as you have received heretofore.

I have had great difficulty in crossing White River, it being swollen, and only reached here to-day. I, however, have a party at Carrollton, who report to me (Sunday) captured rebels, and from them and others have gathered the information that a rebel force of some 300 to 400 are concentrating at Crooked Creek, between Carrollton and Yellville. They are committing all sorts of atrocities on Union people.