War of the Rebellion: Serial 033 Page 0167 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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and taken from those the enemy would conscript. I am still of opinion, as stated in a former communication, that at least one regiment of other troops should be with them. Here in my two districts, in the face of the enemy and skirmishing all winter, I have had very little save troops raised in the Indian Nation and Arkansas.

The lack of transportation is my greatest embarrassment. I designed going to Fort Gibson March 5, and throwing up earthworks to defend it, making the post my commissary depot. As I was interdicted from doing so, I am anchored where my commissary train arrived. I have sent it back, as it could not stay, and put all the commissaries' [stores] I could not haul in the post at Hildebrand's. That point cannot now be attacked in force; besides, I support it and Faytteville, and am able to move.

With profound respect, I remain, your obedient servant,

WM. A. PHILLIPS,

Colonel, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, March 31, 1863.

These districts being now within Major-General Blunt's command, this report is respectfully referred for his information.

Colonel Phillips will hereafter make reports through Major-General Blunt.

By order of Major-General Curtis:

H. Z. CURTIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Camp on James Fort, 2 miles north of White River, March 21, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel C. W. MARSH,

Chief of Staff:

I have been suddenly water bound by both White and James Rivers, but think that to-morrow I will get over the former under difficulties. Colonel Kent, at Forsyth, importunes me for assistance. I go, but must take the south side for forage, unless instructed by you to the contrary. I will arrange an attack cautious on Yellville, which seems to be the next, now interfering with the Forsyth people. I have already scoured the country to Berryville. No rebels; but have a forage train on south side which I cannot get over, for high water suddenly interposed. Tell the general I hope he is in command, at least enough to take me with him. We have heard of Sumner's death, and are expecting to hear that he commands the department.

WM. WEER,

Colonel, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE FRONTIER,

Rolla, Mo., March 21, 1863.

Brigadier General JAMES TOTTEN,

Commanding 2nd Div., Army of the Frontier, Camp on Elk Creek:

GENERAL: It is still reported that Marmaduke intends making another raid in some direction; what, does not appear. He may possibly attempt to pass between your division and White River, for the