War of the Rebellion: Serial 032 Page 0839 Chapter XXXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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case is but a just punishment for their misdeeds, and it will prove a warning to all evil-doers to turn from their ways, and the punishment so promptly executed upon them "will fire the Union heart," and convince the loyal men that reward for treason "is about played out" in this district, and that honest men who, with unwavering faith, have looked to the flag of their country for protection will hereafter reap the reward due their fidelity. If Messrs. Ames & Co. are disloyal, as a matter of course their property should not be shipped.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BEN. LOAN,

Brigadier-General, Missouri State Militia.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, D. C., December 17, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Could the civil authority be introduced into Missouri in lieu of the military to any extent with advantage and safety?

A. LINCOLN.

SAINT LOUIS, MO.,

December 17, 1862-9.15 p. m. (Received December 18, 5. 45 p. m.)

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

Dispatch received. The peace of this State rests on military power. To relinquish this power would be dangerous. It would allow rebels to rule some sections and ruin the Union men who have joined the military power to put down the rebellion. The civil authority is gradually coming into use, but sneaking rebels are in office, anxious to encourage new raids, and secure revenge for past military surveillance. It requires a considerable military force to keep things quiet in Missouri.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Major-General, Commanding.

[DECEMBER 17, 1862.-For Gorman to Curtis, in reference to co-operation with Sherman, see Series I, Vol. XVII, Part II, p. 421.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, December 18, 1862.

Governor GAMBLE, Saint Louis, Mo.:

It is represented to me that the enrolled militia alone would now maintain law and order in all the counties of your State north of the Missouri River. If so, all other forces there might be removed south of the river or out of the State. Please post yourself, and give me your opinion upon this subject.

A. LINCOLN.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 18, 1862.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President:

I can maintain law and order north of the Missouri River with the enrolled militia alone if they can be certainly provided for with subsist-