War of the Rebellion: Serial 032 Page 0756 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV.

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I shall soon move south, crossing White River at Buffalo City, and will move in the direction of Crooked Creek, southeast of Yellville, unless circumstances make it necessary to change my course.

Am short of rations; have to employ part of the men to procure provisions. Will send wagons back.

I am, your obedient servant,

C. B. HOLLAND,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Enrolled Missouri Militia.

Brigadier-General SANBORN.

NOVEMBER 13, 1863.- Skirmish at Mount Ida, Ark.

Report of Brigadier General John McNeil, U. S. Army.

FORT SMITH, ARK., November 18, 1863.

GENERAL: Captains [J. R.] Vanderpool and [G. W. R.] Smith, of Colonel [J. M.] Johnson's command, stationed at Waldron, with 100 men attacked Bankhead's camp, at Mount Ida, on the 13th, killing and wounding several, and taking prisoners Major Moulton, of Clarkton, and 8 or 10 men. They captured 10,000 rounds of ammunition, 15,000 pounds of bacon, and a room full of flour, which they destroyed. This raid was a complete success, routing a driving an enemy of ten times their number 5 miles beyond Mount Ida, and scattering them through the country. Marmaduke is at Washington, having just returned from Pine Bluff. He has 4,000 men and seventeen pieces of artillery. Price is scattered from Washington to Camden, with about 10,000 infantry.

JOHN McNEIL,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General SCHOFIELD.

NOVEMBER 14-17, 1863.- Expedition from Helena, Ark.

Report of Major Eagleton Carmichael, Tenth Illinois Cavalry.

HELENA, ARK., November 17, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of an expedition under my command, November 14, 1863:

On Saturday, November 14, at 4.30 o'clock, I left Helena on board the steam Hamilton Belle, and landed at Delta, Miss., at 6 o'clock the same day, arriving at Friar's Point at 7 o'clock, and found nothing of importance. The night being such that the boat commander thought it dangerous to run, we lay up for the night. On the next morning (November 15), I left at daylight. The boat landed at Island Sixty-three, putting some passengers off. From there we proceeded down to the foot of Island Sixty five, where we disembarked, at Gillen's wood-yard; got a prisoner at Gillen's house, by the name of Dyer, belonging to the Third Arkansas Cavalry, Company F, and with him one horse and equipments, with some all mail matter of no importance. On the shore near here I captured a commissary sergeant, of [Casteel's?] company, and a negro man, one having a mule and the other a horse; no arms. From here I