War of the Rebellion: Serial 032 Page 0698 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV.

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the attention of the general commanding to the fact that passes in and out of the posts of Sedalia, Springfield, and Kansas City, signed by commanders of the posts, and also permits to carry arms, were found on the bodies of a number of the rebels killed in the fight; and from them and other papers, there is no doubt but that a portion of Quantrill's force was made up of persons belonging to the Missouri militia.

I desire to take special notice of the bravery and coolness of Lieutenant James B. Pond, Company C, Third Wisconsin Cavalry, commanding the camp; Sergeant McKenzie, of Company C, Third Wisconsin Cavalry, and the first sergeant, R. W. Smith, of said company.

The number of the killed is as follows:

Major H. Z. Curtis, Lieutenant A. W. Farr, Lieutenant [Ralph E.] Cook........................................................... 3

Members of brigade band....................................... 14

Clerks and orderlies........................................... 6

Company A, Fourteenth Kansas................................... 18

Company I, Third Wisconsin..................................... 23

Company C, Third Wisconsin (in camp)........................... 6

Citizens....................................................... 10

80

Wounded........................................................ 18

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Total.......................................................... 98

The loss of the enemy, as far as known, is between 20 and 30.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. S. HENNING,

Major Third Wisconsin Cavalry.

Colonel OLIVER D. GREENE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis.

Numbers 4. Report of Lieutenant James B. Pond, Third Wisconsin Cavalry.

BAXTER SPRINGS, CHEROKEE NATION,

October 7, 1863.

COLONEL: I was attacked to-day by Quantrill with about 650 men, and, after one hour's hard fighting, I am able to report to you that I still hold the post, and the old flag floats over us as proudly as ever.

The attack was made from the woods east of the camp. It was unexpected, as I had sent my cavalry out not more than an hour previous to reconnoiter on the same road the enemy came in on. My men were at dinner when the attack was made, and most of them were obliged to break through the enemy's lines in order to get their arms, which were in camp. In doing this, 4 of my men were shot down. I was in my tent about 200 yards west of the camp when I heard the first firing. The reason for my camp being here was, that I had just arrived with re-enforcements, and the camp was not large enough to accommodate the whole of my command, and I had just had the men at work extending the defense up to my quarters. When I looked out, I saw the camp surrounded on all sides by mounted men two ranks deep. I called what men were near to me to get inside the camps if impossible. At the same time I ran through the enemy's ranks myself, and got safely inside, where I found the enemy's men as numerous as my own. In a moment every man was rallied, and we soon succeeded in getting the